CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Acad Ophthalmol 2018; 10(01): e98-e107
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1666850
Research Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Burnout in Ophthalmology Residency: A National Survey

Shu Feng
1  Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Parisa Taravati
1  Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Leona Ding
1  Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
Shivali Menda
1  Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was supported by an unrestricted departmental grant from Research to Prevent Blindness. The funding organization had no role in the design or conduct of this research.
Further Information

Publication History

04 April 2018

04 June 2018

Publication Date:
19 July 2018 (online)

  

Abstract

Purpose To determine prevalence of burnout in ophthalmology residents in the United States using the Maslach Burnout Inventory—Human Services Survey and to identify factors associated with burnout and wellness.

Methods Anonymous survey distributed to residents via residency program directors.

Results Ninety-one programs out of 113 (80.5%) confirmed survey distribution. Of 267 included respondents, 23 (8.6%) met criteria for high burnout, and 169 (63.3%) met criteria for at least one aspect of burnout. Longer work hours, longer hours spent on call, higher number of consults seen on call, fewer hours of sleep on call, and not meeting recommended physical activity minimums were associated with higher emotional exhaustion. Most common factors cited to improve wellness included physical activity, nurturing relationships, and co-resident support, whereas most commonly cited factors that contributed to burnout included sleep deprivation, call, and workload.

Conclusion Burnout in ophthalmology residents is common, occurring at similar rates as reported in residencies of other specialties.