Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2018; 78(10): 159-160
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1671233
Poster
Donnerstag, 01.11.2018
Case-Report I
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

A giant fetal lymphangioma of the axilla and the anterolateral thorax: pre- and postnatal aspects

N Bock
1  Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Geburtshilfe, Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland
,
LM Raddatz
1  Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Geburtshilfe, Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland
,
F Louwen
1  Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Geburtshilfe, Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
20 September 2018 (online)

 

Objective:

A septated fetal lymphangioma takes its origin from the failure of drainage of the lymphatic ducts into the final venous vessels. Its prevalence has been reported to be about 1.1 – 5.3 per 10000 births. The evidence for treatment modalities is low. That is why we report our perinatal Management.

Material and methods:

A 38-year-old woman was presented to our clinic at 28+3 weeks' gestation with a fetal right-sided mass. The mass measuring 10 × 10 cm, filling the right fetal axilla, was subsepted without colour Doppler flow and well-circumscribed borders. A multidisciplinary approach was undertaken. To protect the uterus and prolong the pregnancy we minimized the increasing mass by performing three intrauterine punctions. Directly after the third punction a healthy baby was delivered via cesarean section at 35 weeks' gestation. Five days after the MRI showed a mass of 12 × 7,5 × 17 cm. Day 31 an operative resection of the lymphangioma (20 × 20 × 15 cm) was performed. The histological examinations confirmed the diagnosis of a lymphangioma. The neonate was discharged 5 days later in healthy condition.

Conclusion:

A giant fetal lymphangioma is treatable but requires perioperative planning, multidisciplinary coordination, and careful operative decision-making to ensure optimal safety of mother and fetus. Intrauterine punctions could help to prolong the pregancy.

Zoom Image
Abb. 1: Giant fetal lymphangioma of the axilla and the antelateral thorax pre- and postnatal