IJNT 2018; 15(02/03): 100-105
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676906
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Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd.

Outcome Analysis of Upper versus Lower Cervical Spine Injuries

Deepak Kumar Singh
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Anuj Chhabra
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Rakesh Kumar
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Faran Ahmad
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Kuldeep Yadav
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Mohammad Kaif
1  Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
23 July 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Back Ground/Objective Cervical spine injuries are considered to be a major trauma and classified in various types. They are associated with various neurologic deficits and mortality rates. They account for 50 to 75% of all spine injuries. Various studies are associated with outcome of spinal cord injuries. Our aim was to analyze outcome of upper and lower cervical spine injuries.

Study Design It was a retrospective study in all traumatic cervical spine injuries in all age groups at our center during the past 3 years.

Method All cases operated in the past 3 years at our center were taken up for study. Initial hospital records were reviewed. Patients will be divided into two groups on the basis of anatomic level upper (C1 and C2) and lower (C3 or below) cervical spine. Outcomes were analyzed on criteria of demography, mechanism of injury, preoperative neurologic status, involvement of respiratory system, and time of surgery following injury.

Result tatically significant test was applied for analysis of outcome of cervical spine injury based on aforementioned criteria.

Conclusion In this study, survival rates of patients with upper and lower cervical spine injuries were calculated on the basis of mechanism of injury, preoperative neurologic status, respiratory involvement, and time of surgery following injury. Operative treatment of lower cervical injury was better associated with an improved outcome than upper cervical spine injuries. Further prospective study is required for better assessment.