Int J Angiol 2019; 28(01): 011-016
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1676958
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Visceral Artery Aneurysms: Decision Making and Treatment Options in the New Era of Minimally Invasive and Endovascular Surgery

Maen Aboul Hosn
1  Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa.
,
Jun Xu
1  Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa.
,
Mel Sharafuddin
1  Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa.
,
John D. Corson
2  Department of Surgery, the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
08 January 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

The abdominal viscera blood supply is derived from anterior branches of the abdominal aorta. Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs) include aneurysms of the following arteries and their branches: the celiac artery, the hepatic artery, the splenic artery, the superior mesenteric artery, the inferior mesenteric artery, the pancreaticoduodenal artery, and the gastroduodenal artery. Overall VAAs comprise < 2% of all types of arterial aneurysms. Asymptomatic VAAs are now being encountered more frequently due to the widespread use of advanced diagnostic abdominal imaging. The incidental finding of a VAA frequently leaves clinicians with a dilemma as to the best course of management. The focus of this review is on current treatment options and management guidelines for both symptomatic and asymptomatic VAAs.