J Neurol Surg B 2019; 80(02): 139-148
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1677690
Invited Review
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Bone Conduction Implants for Hearing Rehabilitation in Skull Base Tumor Patients

Lauren Placke
1  Bobby R. Alford MD Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Eric N. Appelbaum
1  Bobby R. Alford MD Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Akash J. Patel
2  Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
3  Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Alex D. Sweeney
1  Bobby R. Alford MD Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
2  Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
4  Division of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

26 November 2018

05 December 2018

Publication Date:
06 February 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Bone conduction implants transfer sound to the inner ear through direct vibration of the skull. In patients with skull base tumors and infections, these devices can bypass a dysfunctional ear canal and/or middle ear. Though not all skull base surgery patients opt for bone conduction hearing rehabilitation, a variety of these devices have been developed and marketed over time. This article reviews the evolution and existing state of bone conduction technology.

Financial Material and Support

Internal departmental funding was utilized without commercial sponsorship or support.


Disclosure

This article discusses off-label uses of bone-conduction hearing devices.