J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2019; 80(03): 143-148
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1677823
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Intraoperative Anesthesiology Management and Patient Outcomes for Surgical Revascularization for Moyamoya Disease: A Review and Clinical Experience

George W. Williams II
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
William S. Jones
2  University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Rabail Chaudhry
3  Deparment of Anesthesiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
,
Chunyan Cai
4  Department of Clinical and Translational Sciences, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Greesha S. Pednekar
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Alia C. Long
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Shilpa Chouhan
5  Department of Anesthesiology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Carlos Artime
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Robert C. Wegner
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Navneet K. Grewal
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Velvet M. Patterson
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Daniel A. Contreras
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
,
Lara Ferrario
1  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas John P. and Katherine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

08 February 2018

19 November 2018

Publication Date:
28 February 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular condition, often presenting as a headache or stroke in adults. Anesthetic management of this illness may challenge providers because it can affect the long-term neurologic outcome and hospital length of stay (LOS) in patients with MMD.

Materials and Methods A literature search was conducted to assess etiology and epidemiology, as well as existing reports of intraoperative management of MMD. Due to sparse findings, the search was expanded to include studies of the use of intraoperative anesthetic agents during other neurosurgical procedures. We also retrospectively reviewed all MMD cases from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2015, at Memorial Hermann Hospital-Texas Medical Center, where intraoperative management involved craniotomy and surgical revascularization. Data were collected primarily on the use of several anesthetic agents. The LOS and any adverse events were also recorded for each case. The data were divided into two equivalent case cohorts: (1) January 1, 2009, to February 18, 2013, and (2) February 19, 2013, to December 31, 2015.

Results Remifentanil use notably increased between the first and second time periods while fentanyl use decreased. Desflurane usage also demonstrated an observed increase when our two cohorts were compared. Additionally, there was a decrease in the mean LOS between the first and second periods of 3.9 and 3.3 days, respectively.

Conclusion Increasing use of remifentanil in MMD cases could be attributed to its ability to provide more stable hemodynamics during induction, maintenance, and emergence of anesthesia when compared with fentanyl. Lower systolic pressures, diastolic pressures, and heart rates were reported in patients receiving remifentanil over fentanyl.