Neuropediatrics 2019; 50(05): 334-335
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1691833
Images in Neuropediatrics
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Pott's Disease: An Emerging Source of Potentially Inappropriate Treatment

Silvia Esposito
1  Neurology Division Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, Milan, Italy
,
Marco Moscatelli
2  Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, Milan, Italy
,
Marco Paolo Schiariti
3  Department of Neurosurgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, Milan, Italy
,
Ilaria Viganò
1  Neurology Division Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, Milan, Italy
,
Chiara Pantaleoni
1  Neurology Division Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, Milan, Italy
,
Gianluca Marucci
4  Neuropathology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, Milan, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

05 April 2019

23 April 2019

Publication Date:
29 May 2019 (online)

Abstract

Spinal Tuberculosis in children is uncommon, even more so in cases of involvement of posterior vertebral elements, and its diagnosis is often delayed. Here we report the case of a young female presenting neuroradiological features and clinical symptoms suspicious for malignant tumor. Histological examination of biopsy specimen evidenced a Pott's disease. We highlight the importance of suspecting this disorder in children with both aspecific systemic and neurological symptoms, in order to reach a timely diagnosis for appropriate and targeted intervention, avoiding the risk of overtreatment and malpractice claims.

Study funding

No targeted funding reported.


Disclosure

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose with regard to this manuscript.


Ethical Approval

An informed consent form was signed by the parents of the patient to approve the use of patient information or material for scientific purposes. The patient identity has not been disclosed anywhere in the manuscript and does not contain any identifiable images.