Thorac cardiovasc Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692660
Original Cardiovascular
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Surgical Repair of a Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm: A 22-Year Single-Center Experience

1  Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hanyang University Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
,
Ji-Hyuk Yang
2  Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Vascular Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
,
Pyo Won Park
2  Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Vascular Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
,
Jinyoung Song
3  Department of Pediatrics, Heart Vascular Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
,
June Huh
3  Department of Pediatrics, Heart Vascular Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
,
I-Seok Kang
3  Department of Pediatrics, Heart Vascular Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
,
Tae-Gook Jun
2  Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Vascular Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

24 March 2019

07 May 2019

Publication Date:
12 July 2019 (online)

Abstract

Background Several reports described the repair of sinus of Valsalva aneurysms (SVAs); however, there is still debate regarding the optimal method of operation. We investigated the determinants of the development of significant aortic regurgitation (AR) and long-term survival after surgical repair.

Methods Between January 1995 and December 2016, 71 patients (31 females; median age: 33.3 years) underwent surgical SVA repair with (n = 60) or without (n = 11) rupture. Aortic valvuloplasty (AVP) was performed using Trusler's technique in 28 patients (39.4%), and 11 patients (15.5%) underwent aortic valve replacement during the first operation.

Results There was no early mortality, and three deaths occurred during follow-up (median: 65.4 months). Patients with grade II preoperative AR who underwent AVP tended to develop significant postoperative AR, but freedom from significant AR did not differ statistically (p = 0.387). Among patients who underwent AVP, freedom from significant AR did not differ statistically between those with grades I and II and those with grades III and IV (p = 0.460).

Conclusion Surgical repair of SVA with or without rupture can be performed safely using the dual approach technique. Concomitant aortic valve repair can be performed without difficulty and should be recommended not only for patients with moderate or severe preoperative AR (grades III and IV) but also for those with minimal or mild preoperative AR (grades I and II), whose aortic valve geometry needs correction.

Note

This article was presented by Jun Ho Lee (lead author) at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease, January 14–15, 2017.