Thorac cardiovasc Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1696953
Original Cardiovascular
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Impact of Preoperative Functional Status on Quality of Life after Cardiac Surgery

Dominik Joskowiak
1  Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munchen, Bayern, Germany
,
Daniela Meusel
1  Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munchen, Bayern, Germany
,
Christine Kamla
1  Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munchen, Bayern, Germany
,
Christian Hagl
1  Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munchen, Bayern, Germany
,
Gerd Juchem
1  Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munchen, Bayern, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

18 May 2019

26 July 2019

Publication Date:
09 September 2019 (online)

Abstract

Background With increasing importance, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has become a crucial outcome measure of cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of HRQoL change within 12 months after surgery and to identify predictors of deterioration in physical and mental health.

Methods The cohort of this prospective study included 164 consecutive patients who underwent elective surgery. HRQoL was assessed on the basis of the Short-Form 36 questionnaire at three different times: upon admission and at 3 and 12 months after surgery. The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was used to determine whether the surgery resulted in deterioration of HRQoL.

Results In general, physical and mental health status improved within the first year after cardiac surgery. However, after 12 months, 7.9 and 21.2% of patients had clinically significant poorer physical (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores, based on the MCID approach. The results of multivariate analysis identified preoperative health status, age < 70 years, coronary artery bypass grafting, and a previous neurological event as predictors of deterioration in postoperative HRQoL. The greatest risks for deterioration were higher preoperative PCS and MCS scores.

Conclusion Although we were able to demonstrate a general improvement in the HRQoL following cardiac surgery, in one-fifth of patients, there was no recovery of mental health status even after 1 year. As this effect is mainly determined by preoperative functional status, HRQoL should be an integral part of medical consultation, especially in younger patients with a positive perception of quality of life.