CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · J Neurosci Rural Pract 2019; 10(03): 459-464
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697872
Original Article
Association for Helping Neurosurgical Sick People

Poststroke Cognitive Decline: A Longitudinal Study from a Tertiary Care Center

Rameshwar Nath Chaurasia
1  Department of Neurology, Institute of Medical Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Jitendra Sharma
1  Department of Neurology, Institute of Medical Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Abhishek Pathak
1  Department of Neurology, Institute of Medical Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Vijay Nath Mishra
1  Department of Neurology, Institute of Medical Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
,
Deepika Joshi
1  Department of Neurology, Institute of Medical Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
07 October 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Objectives Poststroke cognitive decline (PSCD) is a serious disabling consequence of stroke. The purpose of this study is to find the prevalence of PSCD and sociodemographic and clinical determinants of risk factors of PSCD.

Materials and Methods This study was a prospective, hospital-based study conducted on 200 stroke patients from stroke registry during October 2015 to April 2017. Detailed clinical evaluation was done. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores were used to determine PSCD after 3 and 6 months as per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V. Chi-squared test was used to find the association between two variables. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the difference in cognitive impairment between two follow-ups at 3 and 6 months, respectively. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results The prevalence of PSCD measured by MoCA scale at 3 and 6 months was 67 and 31.6%, respectively. By MMSE scale, cognitive decline prevalence at 3 months was found to be 87 (46.3%), which reduced to 22 (17.1%) at 6 months. The association between MMSE scale and type of stroke was significant at 3 months.

Conclusion One-third of the stroke patients developed PSCD within 3 months of onset of stroke, with different levels of severity. The major predictors of new-onset poststroke cognitive impairment were diabetes and hypertension. The prevalence of PSCD reduced significantly at 6 months of stroke on follow-up.