J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1701635
Review Article

Importance and Evidence of Extent of Resection in Glioblastoma

Victoria Wykes
1  Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Athanasios Zisakis
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Mihaela Irimia
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Ismail Ughratdar
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Vijay Sawlani
3  Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Colin Watts
1  Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Maximal safe resection is an essential part of the multidisciplinary care of patients with glioblastoma. A growing body of data shows that gross total resection is an independent prognostic factor associated with improved clinical outcome. The relationship between extent of glioblastoma (GB) resection and clinical benefit depends critically on the balance between cytoreduction and avoiding neurologic morbidity. The definition of the extent of tumor resection, how this is best measured pre- and postoperatively, and its relation to volume of residual tumor is still discussed. We review the literature supporting extent of resection in GB, highlighting the importance of a standardized definition and measurement of extent of resection to allow greater collaboration in research projects and trials. Recent developments in neurosurgical techniques and technologies focused on maximizing extent of resection and safety are discussed.



Publication History

Received: 30 June 2019

Accepted: 22 October 2019

Publication Date:
13 October 2020 (online)

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