Thorac Cardiovasc Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708478
Original Cardiovascular
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Alternative Access Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Nonagenarians versus Younger Patients

Nicole Lin
1  Department of Graduate Education, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
,
Marcos A. Nores
2  Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Medical Center, Atlantis, Florida, United States
,
1  Department of Graduate Education, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
,
Mark Rothenberg
2  Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Medical Center, Atlantis, Florida, United States
,
Sotiris C. Stamou
2  Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Medical Center, Atlantis, Florida, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

21 August 2019

08 February 2020

Publication Date:
06 April 2020 (online)

Abstract

Background Numerous studies have documented the safety of alternatives access (AA) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for patients who are not candidates for transfemoral or surgical approach. There is a scarcity of studies relating use of AA TAVR in nonagenarian patients, a high-risk, frail group. Our study sought to investigate the clinical outcomes of nonagenarians who underwent AA TAVR for aortic stenosis, with comparison of nonagenarians age ≥90 years with patients age <90 years.

Methods A cohort study of 171 consecutive patients undergoing AA TAVR (transapical [TA, n = 101, 59%], transaxillary [TAX, n = 56, 33%], transaortic [TAO, n = 11, 6%], and transcarotid [TC, n = 3, 2%]) from 2012 to 2019 was analyzed. Baseline, operative, and postoperative characteristics, as well as actuarial survival outcomes, were compared.

Results AA TAVR patients had decreased aortic valve gradients with no difference detected in nonagenarians and younger patients. Operative mortality was 8% (n = 14; nine TA, three TAO, and two TAX). Compared to younger patients, significantly more nonagenarians were recorded to have new onset atrial fibrillation (7 vs. 5%, p < 0.01*). No significant difference in mortality or postoperative complications, such as stroke, pacemaker requirements, was detected. Actuarial survival at 1 and 5 years was 86 versus 87% (nonagenarians vs younger patients) and 36 versus 22%, respectively, with log-rank = 0.97.

Conclusion AA TAVR in nonagenarian patients who are not candidates for transfemoral approach can be efficaciously performed with comparable clinical outcomes to younger patients, age <90 years. Furthermore, some access sites should be avoided when possible; notably TA was associated with increased mortality, stroke, and new onset atrial fibrillation.

Disclaimer

This research was supported (in whole or in part) by HCA Healthcare and/or an HCA Healthcare affiliated entity. The views expressed in this publication represent those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of HCA Healthcare or any of its affiliated entities.