CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Revista Fisioterapia Invasiva / Journal of Invasive Techniques in Physical Therapy 2020; 03(01): 006
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1712511
Original Article
Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Changes in pH as a result of galvanic currents used in percutaneous needle electrolysis

Article in several languages: English | español
1   Unit of Histology and Neurobiology, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rovira i Virgili University, Reus, Spain
,
2   MVClinic Institute, Madrid, Spain
3   Department of Physiotherapy, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain
,
2   MVClinic Institute, Madrid, Spain
3   Department of Physiotherapy, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid, Spain
,
1   Unit of Histology and Neurobiology, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rovira i Virgili University, Reus, Spain
,
1   Unit of Histology and Neurobiology, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rovira i Virgili University, Reus, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

16 December 2019

08 April 2020

Publication Date:
30 June 2020 (online)

Abstract

Aim To determine whether sodium chloride electrolysis causes a change in the pH of tissues.

Methods The effects of a 3 mA galvanic current has been evaluated, applied for 3 seconds and 3 repetitions (3:3:3). In vitro pH changes were evaluated in three experiments: 1) Eppendorf® tubes filled with Ringer's solution; 2) a very small volume of Ringer's solution (100µl); 3) Eppendorf® tubes filled with saline solution (NaCl 0.9%). The pH changes in the gastrocnemius of mice were evaluated, using the left limb as a control and the right limb for the intervention. The gastrocnemius muscles were ground up and the pH of each group was determined.

Results In the in vitro experiments 1 and 2, no variation was observed in the pH of either the cathode in the Ringer's solution or the anode in the Ringer's solution (the variation did not exceed 16% in either of the cases, p> 0.05). In the third in vitro study, the pH after galvanic current application increased by 70% in the saline solution of the cathode and the anode pH decreased by 34% (p < 0.05 in both cases). In the in vivo experiments, no change in pH was obtained (% variation: 0.00 ± 0.00).

Conclusions The galvanic current used in percutaneous needle electrolysis applying the 3:3:3 parameters generates very small changes in the pH, in the area near the needle, which the body is able to rapidly compensate for.