CC BY 4.0 · VCOT Open 2020; 03(02): e60-e65
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1713123
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Epidemiological Analysis of Avulsion Fractures in Dogs

Alyssa M. Matos Cruz
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States
,
Mitsunori Kayano
2  Department of Veterinary Medicine, Research Center for Global Agromedicine, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Japan
,
Mizuki Tomihari
2  Department of Veterinary Medicine, Research Center for Global Agromedicine, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Japan
,
3  Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of California - Davis, Davis, California, United States
,
4  Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States
,
Amy S. Kapatkin
3  Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of California - Davis, Davis, California, United States
,
Kei Hayashi
1  Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

14 December 2019

29 April 2020

Publication Date:
28 July 2020 (online)

Abstract

Objective This study aimed to analyse the epidemiological data of canine appendicular avulsion fractures from three academic veterinary hospitals in the United States.

Study Design A total of 114 avulsion fractures that presented to three study centres (teaching hospitals in New York, California, and Michigan) between 2008 and 2018 were analysed for avulsion type, breed, sex, body weight, age and affected side.

Results The mean age for avulsion fractures was 1.6 years (±2.3 standard deviation), and side and sex were comparable (53% females and 54% left sided, only 2% bilateral). Tibial tuberosity fracture was the most common type, comprising 54% of all avulsion fractures, significantly more prevalent in younger and lighter dogs (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in avulsion type, breed, sex, weight, age and affected side among three study centres (p = 0.66).

Conclusion The most common avulsion fractures were tibial tuberosity fractures, which tend to occur in young, small dogs. There is no sex or side predilection for avulsion fractures noted in this study, although the effect of neuter could not be determined. There were no differences in fracture characteristics among the three different geographical locations in the United States.