Thromb Haemost
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1718730
Review Article

Methods to Investigate miRNA Function: Focus on Platelet Reactivity

Alix Garcia
1  Geneva Platelet Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Sylvie Dunoyer-Geindre
1  Geneva Platelet Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Richard J. Fish
2  Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Marguerite Neerman-Arbez
2  Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
3  iGE3, Institute of Genetics and Genomics in Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Jean-Luc Reny
1  Geneva Platelet Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
4  Division of General Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Pierre Fontana
1  Geneva Platelet Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
5  Division of Angiology and Haemostasis, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was supported by the Private Foundation of the University Hospitals of Geneva (grant RC04–05).

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs modulating protein production. They are key players in regulation of cell function and are considered as biomarkers in several diseases. The identification of the proteins they regulate, and their impact on cell physiology, may delineate their role as diagnostic or prognostic markers and identify new therapeutic strategies. During the last 3 decades, development of a large panel of techniques has given rise to multiple models dedicated to the study of miRNAs. Since plasma samples are easily accessible, circulating miRNAs can be studied in clinical trials. To quantify miRNAs in numerous plasma samples, the choice of extraction and purification techniques, as well as normalization procedures, are important for comparisons of miRNA levels in populations and over time. Recent advances in bioinformatics provide tools to identify putative miRNAs targets that can then be validated with dedicated assays. In vitro and in vivo approaches aim to functionally validate candidate miRNAs from correlations and to understand their impact on cellular processes. This review describes the advantages and pitfalls of the available techniques for translational research to study miRNAs with a focus on their role in regulating platelet reactivity.

Authors' Contributions

A.G. had the initial idea and conceptualized this work, A.G., S.D.-G., and P.F. wrote the first draft of the manuscript. J.-L.R., M.N.-A., and R.J.F. critically revised the manuscript. All authors approved the manuscript.




Publication History

Received: 09 July 2020

Accepted: 08 September 2020

Publication Date:
29 October 2020 (online)

© 2020. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Stuttgart · New York