CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Indian Journal of Neurosurgery 2021; 10(02): 108-113
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1719202
Original Article

Long-term Dysphagia following Acoustic Neuroma Surgery: Prevalence, Severity, and Predictive Factors

1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
,
Davi Jorge Fontoura Solla
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
,
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
,
Marcos de Queiroz Teles Gomes
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
,
Hector Tomas Navarro Cabrera
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
,
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
,
Eberval Gadelha Figueiredo
1  Department of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Background Acoustic neuroma (AN) may compress the cerebellum and brainstem and may cause dysfunction of bulbar cranial nerves.

Objective To describe swallowing function outcomes in the late postoperative period after AN surgery.

Methods This cohort study included patients operated on between 1999–2014, with a mean follow up of 6.4 ± 4.5 years. The swallowing function was assessed through the functional oral intake scale (FOIS). The primary outcome was defined by scores 5 to 1, which implied oral feeding restriction or adaptation. Risks factors were identified through multivariate logistic regression.

Results 101 patients were evaluated. As many as 46 (45.5%) presented dysphagia on the late postoperative period. Women comprised 77.2%, and the mean age was 47.1 ± 16.0 years (range 19–80). Dysphagic patients presented more type II neurofibromatosis (NF II) (32.6% vs. 10.9%, p = 0.007), larger tumors (3.8 ± 1.1 vs. 3.1 ± 1.0 cm, p < 0.001), partial resection (50.0% vs. 85.5%, p < 0.001) and needed more surgeries (≥2, 39.1% vs. 18.2%, p = 0.019). Important peripheral facial palsy (PFP) (House–Brackmann [HB] grade ≥3) was present before the surgery on 47.5% and worsened on 55.4%. Postoperative PFP (p < 0.001), but not preoperative PFP, was predictive of postoperative dysphagia. On multivariate analysis, the following factors were risk factors for dysphagia: NF II (OR 5.54, p = 0.034), tumor size (each 1 cm, OR 2.13, p = 0.009), partial resection (OR 5.23, p = 0.022) and postoperative HB grade ≥3 (OR 12.99, p = 0.002).

Conclusions Dysphagia after AN surgery is highly correlated to postoperative facial motor function. NF II, tumor size, and extent of resection were also predictive of this morbidity in the late postoperative period.



Publication History

Publication Date:
19 April 2021 (online)

© 2021. Neurological Surgeons’ Society of India. This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial-License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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