Semin Thromb Hemost 2021; 47(07): 875-884
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1729964
Review Article

Rotational Thromboelastometry in Neonates Admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Large Cross-sectional Study

Rozeta Sokou*
1  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, “Agios Panteleimon” General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece
,
Andreas G. Tsantes*
2  Laboratory of Haematology and Blood Bank Unit, “Attikon” Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
,
Aikaterini Konstantinidi
1  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, “Agios Panteleimon” General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece
,
Georgios Ioakeimidis
1  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, “Agios Panteleimon” General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece
,
Maria Lampridou
1  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, “Agios Panteleimon” General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece
,
Stavroula Parastatidou
1  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, “Agios Panteleimon” General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece
,
Martha Theodoraki
1  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, “Agios Panteleimon” General Hospital of Nikaia, Piraeus, Greece
,
Daniele Piovani
3  Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele, Milan, Italy
4  IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
,
Zoe Iliodromiti
5  Neonatal Department, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaeio Hospital, Athens, Greece
,
Theodora Boutsikou
5  Neonatal Department, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaeio Hospital, Athens, Greece
,
Nicoletta Iacovidou
5  Neonatal Department, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaeio Hospital, Athens, Greece
,
Panagiota Douramani
2  Laboratory of Haematology and Blood Bank Unit, “Attikon” Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
,
Aristarchos Poulis
2  Laboratory of Haematology and Blood Bank Unit, “Attikon” Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
,
Styliani Kokoris
2  Laboratory of Haematology and Blood Bank Unit, “Attikon” Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
,
Anastasios G. Kriebardis
6  Laboratory of Hematology, Department of Biomedical Science, School of Health and Caring Science, University of West Attica, Egaleo, Greece
,
Stefanos Bonovas
3  Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele, Milan, Italy
4  IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
,
Argirios E. Tsantes
2  Laboratory of Haematology and Blood Bank Unit, “Attikon” Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to assess the coagulation profile in neonatal critical illness using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), and to investigate its association with disease severity and its potential prognostic role in this clinical setting. Over a period of 67 months (July 2014–February 2020) 423 critically ill neonates with confirmed or suspected sepsis, perinatal hypoxia, or respiratory distress syndrome, hospitalized in our neonatal intensive care unit were included in the study. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded on admission day and arterial blood was analyzed on ROTEM analyzer using the standard extrinsically activated rotational thromboelastometry assay (EXTEM). Neonatal illness severity scores (Modified NEOMOD [Neonatal Multiple Organ Dysfunction] and SNAPPE [Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology with Perinatal Extension]) were calculated at the same time as ROTEM analysis. Mortality during in-hospital stay was the main outcome measure. Multivariable analyses showed that a 10 mm decrease in EXTEM clot amplitude recorded at 10 minutes (A10) is significantly associated with a higher mortality (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33–2.08). Higher modified NEOMOD (OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.26–1.47) and higher SNAPPE scores (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.04–1.08) were also associated with increased mortality. The CT and A10 variables demonstrated the best prognostic performance among the EXTEM parameters for mortality (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.69–0.86 and AUC = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.66–0.85, respectively), showing an optimal cut-off CT ≥63 seconds and A10 ≤37 mm. Using optimal cut-off values of the EXTEM parameters for prediction of mortality, neonates with CT ≥63 seconds were 7.4 times more likely to die (OR = 7.40, 95% CI: 3.50–15.65), while neonates with A10 ≤37 mm were 5.8 times more likely to die (OR = 5.88, 95% CI: 2.94–12.50). An EXTEM hypocoagulable profile on disease onset was shown to be an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality in neonatal critical illness.

Authors' Contributions

R.S. and A.E.T. conceived the study. All authors contributed to the design of the study protocol. R.S., A.K., G.I., M.L., S.P., Z.I., T.B., N.I., M.T.H., P.D., A.P., and S.K. conducted the work and collected the data. A.G.T., S.B., and D.P. performed the statistical analysis. All the authors contributed to the interpretation of data for the work. R.S., A.G.T., and A.E.T. drafted the manuscript. All authors critically revised the paper for important intellectual content and approved the final version to be published.


Ethical Approval

The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Nikaia General Hospital (July 17, 2014, 32/3). Informed consent has been obtained by parents or guardians of enrolled neonates.


* Both authors contributed equally to the study.


Supplementary Material



Publication History

Publication Date:
15 June 2021 (online)

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