CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Semin Liver Dis
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1731707
Review Article

Role of FXR in Bile Acid and Metabolic Homeostasis in NASH: Pathogenetic Concepts and Therapeutic Opportunities

Richard Radun
1  Department of Internal Medicine III, Hans Popper Laboratory of Molecular Hepatology, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria
,
Michael Trauner
1  Department of Internal Medicine III, Hans Popper Laboratory of Molecular Hepatology, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most prevalent cause of liver disease, increasingly contributing to the burden of liver transplantation. In search for effective treatments, novel strategies addressing metabolic dysregulation, inflammation, and fibrosis are continuously emerging. Disturbed bile acid (BA) homeostasis and microcholestasis via hepatocellular retention of potentially toxic BAs may be an underappreciated factor in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) as its progressive variant. In addition to their detergent properties, BAs act as signaling molecules regulating cellular homeostasis through interaction with BA receptors such as the Farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Apart from being a key regulator of BA metabolism and enterohepatic circulation, FXR regulates metabolic homeostasis and has immune-modulatory effects, making it an attractive therapeutic target in NAFLD/NASH. In this review, the molecular basis and therapeutic potential of targeting FXR with a specific focus on restoring BA and metabolic homeostasis in NASH is summarized.



Publication History

Publication Date:
21 July 2021 (online)

© 2021. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

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