Semin Thromb Hemost
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1732467
Review Article

The Role of Fibrin(ogen) in Wound Healing and Infection Control

Katherine J. Kearney
1  Discovery and Translational Science Department, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
,
Robert A.S. Ariëns
1  Discovery and Translational Science Department, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
2  Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
,
Fraser L. Macrae
1  Discovery and Translational Science Department, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
› Author Affiliations
Funding The R.A.S.A. laboratory is supported by grants from the BHF (RG/18/11/34036) and Wellcome Trust (204951/B/16/Z). F.L.M. is supported by a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship (215861/Z/19/Z).

Abstract

Fibrinogen, one of the most abundant plasma proteins playing a key role in hemostasis, is an important modulator of wound healing and host defense against microbes. In the current review, we address the role of fibrin(ogen) throughout the process of wound healing and subsequent tissue repair. Initially fibrin(ogen) acts as a provisional matrix supporting incoming leukocytes and acting as reservoir for growth factors. It later goes on to support re-epithelialization, angiogenesis, and fibroplasia. Importantly, removal of fibrin(ogen) from the wound is essential for wound healing to progress. We also discuss how fibrin(ogen) functions through several mechanisms to protect the host against bacterial infection by providing a physical barrier, entrapment of bacteria in fibrin(ogen) networks, and by directing immune cell function. The central role of fibrin(ogen) in defense against bacterial infection has made it a target of bacterial proteins, evolved to interact with fibrin(ogen) to manipulate clot formation and degradation for the purpose of promoting microbial virulence and survival. Further understanding of the dual roles of fibrin(ogen) in wound healing and infection could provide novel means of therapy to improve recovery from surgical or chronic wounds and help to prevent infection from highly virulent bacterial strains, including those resistant to antibiotics.



Publication History

Publication Date:
24 August 2021 (online)

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