J Knee Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1736148
Original Article

Variability in the Processing of Fresh Osteochondral Allografts

Kyle D. Paul
1   Department of Orthopaedics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
,
Romil K. Patel
1   Department of Orthopaedics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
,
Alexandra M. Arguello
1   Department of Orthopaedics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
,
Adam Kwapisz
2   Clinic of Orthopedics and Pediatric Orthopedics, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
,
Eugene W. Brabston
1   Department of Orthopaedics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
,
3   Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri Orthopaedic Institute, Columbia, Missouri
4   Department of Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics, University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri Orthopaedic Institute, Columbia, Missouri
,
Brent A. Ponce
5   Department of Orthopaedics, Hughston Clinic, Columbus, Georgia
,
Amit M. Momaya
1   Department of Orthopaedics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

The indications for fresh osteochondral allograft continue to increase. As a result, variations in graft processing and preservation methods have emerged. An understanding of these techniques is important when evaluating the optimal protocol for processing fresh osteochondral allografts prior to surgical implantation. The aim of this study is to review the literature and understand various tissue processing protocols of four leading tissue banks in the United States. Donor procurement, serological and microbiological testing, and storage procedures were compared among companies of interest. Similarities between the major tissue banks include donor screening, aseptic processing, and testing for microorganisms. Variability exists between these companies with relation to choice of storage media, antibiotic usage, storage temperature, and graft expiration dates. Potential exists for increased chondrocyte viability and lengthened time-to-expiration of the graft through a protocol of delicate tissue handling, proper choice of storage medium, adding hormones and growth factors like insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to serum-free nutrient media, and storing these grafts closer to physiologic temperatures.



Publication History

Received: 31 March 2021

Accepted: 12 August 2021

Article published online:
02 October 2021

© 2021. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.
333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA