Int J Sports Med 2016; 37(09): 714-722
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-107250
Clinical Sciences
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Investigating a Novel Measure of Brain Networking Following Sports Concussion

S. P. Broglio
1  University of Michigan, Neurotrauma Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, United States
,
A. Rettmann
2  NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
,
J. Greer
3  Michigan NeuroSport, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
,
S. Brimacombe
3  Michigan NeuroSport, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
,
B. Moore
3  Michigan NeuroSport, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
,
N. Narisetty
4  Department of Statistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
,
X. He
4  Department of Statistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States
,
J. Eckner
5  Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 04 August 2016

Publication Date:
10 June 2016 (eFirst)

Abstract

Clinicians managing sports-related concussions are left to their clinical judgment in making diagnoses and return-to-play decisions. This study was designed to evaluate the utility of a novel measure of functional brain networking for concussion management. 24 athletes with acutely diagnosed concussion and 21 control participants were evaluated in a research laboratory. At each of the 4 post-injury time points, participants completed the Axon assessment of neurocognitive function, a self-report symptom inventory, and the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks while electroencephalogram (EEG) readings were recorded. Brain Network Activation (BNA) scores were calculated from EEG data related to the auditory oddball and go/no-go tasks. BNA scores were unable to differentiate between the concussed and control groups or by self-report symptom severity. These findings conflict with previous work implementing electrophysiological assessments in concussed athletes, suggesting that BNA requires additional investigation and refinement before clinical implementation.