CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2017; 77(12): 1291-1298
DOI: 10.1055/s-0043-122884
GebFra Science
Review/Übersicht
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Circulating Tumour Cells, Circulating Tumour DNA and Circulating MicroRNA in Metastatic Breast Carcinoma – What is the Role of Liquid Biopsy in Breast Cancer?

Article in several languages: English | deutsch
Arkadius Polasik
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Marie Tzschaschel
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Fabienne Schochter
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Amelie de Gregorio
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Thomas W. P. Friedl
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Brigitte Rack
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Andreas Hartkopf
2  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
,
Peter A. Fasching
3  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany
,
Andreas Schneeweiss
4  Nationales Centrum für Tumorerkrankungen, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
,
Volkmar Müller
5  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
,
Jens Huober
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Wolfgang Janni
1  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany
,
Tanja Fehm
6  Klinik für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 16 July 2017
revised 09 November 2017

accepted 12 November 2017

Publication Date:
18 December 2017 (online)

Abstract

Dissemination of tumour cells and the development of solid metastases occurs via blood vessels and lymphatics. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) can be detected in venous blood in patients with early and metastatic breast cancer, and their prognostic relevance has been demonstrated on numerous occasions. Repeated testing for CTCs and ctDNA, or regular so-called “liquid biopsy”, can be performed easily at any stage during the course of disease. Additional molecular analysis allows definition of tumour characteristics and heterogeneity that may be associated with treatment resistance. This in turn makes personalised, targeted treatments possible that may achieve both improved overall survival and quality of life.