Int J Sports Med 2018; 39(04): 314-321
DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-100280
Genetics & Molecular Biology
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Two Genetic Variants Associated with Plantar Fascial Disorders

Stuart K. Kim
1  Dept. Developmental Biology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford CA, USA
,
John P.A. Ioannidis
2  Dept. of Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center and Dept. of Health Research and Policy, Division of Epidemiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, and Dept. of Statistics, Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford CA, USA
,
Marwa A Ahmed
3  Dept. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA
,
Andrew L. Avins
4  Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Division of Research, Oakland, California, USA
,
John P. Kleimeyer
5  Dept. Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford CA, USA
,
Michael Fredericson
5  Dept. Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford CA, USA
,
Jason L. Dragoo
5  Dept. Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford CA, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



Publication Date:
13 March 2018 (online)

Abstract

Plantar fascial disorder is comprised of plantar fasciitis and plantar fibromatosis. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, especially for athletes involved in running and jumping sports. Plantar fibromatosis is a rare fibrous hyperproliferation of the deep connective tissue of the foot. To identify genetic loci associated with plantar fascial disorders, a genome-wide association screen was performed using publically available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health including 21,624 cases of plantar fascial disorders and 80,879 controls. One indel (chr5:118704153:D) and one SNP (rs62051384) showed an association with plantar fascial disorders at genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8) with small effects (odds ratios=0.93 and 1.07 per allele, respectively). The indel chr5:118704153:D is located within TNFAIP8 (encodes a protein induced by TNF alpha) and rs62051384 is located within WWP2 (which is involved in proteasomal degradation). These DNA variants may be informative in explaining why some individuals are at higher risk for plantar fascial disorders than others.

Supplementary Material