Facial plast Surg 2003; 19(4): 297-298
DOI: 10.1055/s-2004-815648
PREFACE

Copyright © 2003 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA. Tel.: +1(212) 584-4662

Construction and Reconstruction of the Aesthetic Nose

Thomas Romo III, Anthony P. Sclafani
  • Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY; Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 January 2004 (online)

[[author photo]] [[author photo]]We are pleased to co-edit this issue of Facial Plastic Surgery and would like to acknowledge the editorial assistance of David Dionne, Tyge Burgess, and Erik Wenskus as well as the production staff at Thieme for their help.

For this issue, we have assembled several rhinoplastic methods designed for treatment of the most severe and debilitating nasal problems in the most unfavorable settings. These scenarios radically depart from the pristine environment of the primary rhinoplasty. However, patients expect increasingly sophisticated results, even when significant reconstructive revision is necessary. This has led surgeons to seek beyond traditional rhinoplasty dicta and techniques; conversely, success in these settings has led to extension of these techniques and materials into the primary rhinoplasty. Although traditional teaching has been to avoid the use of synthetic materials in the nose, the success seen with several of these materials demands a less dogmatic, more pragmatic evaluation of their safety and efficacy. We ask the reader to put aside any bias or prejudice and to evaluate the rationale, techniques, and results presented in this issue to draw his own conclusions.