Facial plast Surg 2003; 19(4): 309-316
DOI: 10.1055/s-2004-815650
Copyright © 2003 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA. Tel.: +1(212) 584-4662

Rhinoplasty in the Aging Nose

Thomas Romo, III1,2,3,4 , Peyman Soliemanzadeh1 , Jason A. Litner1 , Anthony P. Sclafani1,2,3
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • 2Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • 3Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
  • 4Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 January 2004 (online)

ABSTRACT

The aging nose presents a difficult challenge for the rhinoplastic surgeon. To best address the patient's wishes, the surgeon must possess a sound understanding of the atrophic changes associated with the aging nose, including tip ptosis, increased nasal bulbosity, a lengthened nasal appearance, and altered nasal airflow patterns. Surgical emphasis is placed on conservative structured reduction to address functional concerns. Overresection risks destabilizing the nasal tip and altering the patient's concrete self-image. This article outlines our approach to rhinoplasty in the aging nose with a special emphasis on the use of porous polyethylene alloimplants to provide added structural support.