Ultraschall in Med 2018; 39(06): 606-609
DOI: 10.1055/a-0720-8864
Editorial
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

POCUS – Chance or Risk?

POCUS – Chance oder Risiko?
Joseph Osterwalder
,
Sevgi Tercanli
Further Information

Correspondence

Prof. em. Dr. med. Joseph Osterwalder
Scheffelstrasse 1
9000 St. Gallen
Schweiz   
Phone: ++ 41/78/4 08 91 39   

Publication History

Publication Date:
14 December 2018 (online)

 

“Point-of-Care Ultrasound” (POCUS) is a term that is currently on everyone’s lips. Its uses vary and it is often equated with focused ultrasound, emergency ultrasound, and pocket ultrasound, for example. The increase in the use of POCUS has resulted not only in a major atmosphere of change and new opportunities for ultrasound but also in a general sense of uncertainty. Some colleagues even view POCUS as a threat with regard to quality assurance. Because POCUS will play a major role in the clinical routine in the future, it seems important to ensure clear understanding and standardized usage of the term. POCUS is a bedside ultrasound method that covers examinations from head to toe. It not only focuses on the macroanatomy and pathology but also allows direct evaluation of functional anatomical aspects, physiology, pathophysiology, and hemodynamics and provides support during interventions. Treating physicians with diverse areas of specialization and an interest in a specific organ pathology, particular diseases/symptoms, or an intervention personally perform examinations in various situations (emergency admission, consultation hours, intensive care unit, operating room, etc.) in real time while determining the scope and interpreting the findings. Another significant component of POCUS is the concept of focused ultrasound. Focused means that the examiner is limited to one or more yes-no ultrasound questions (from simple to complicated) and does not perform a conventional comprehensive organ examination or examination of a region or functional unit. The focus is less on ultrasound as an isolated diagnostic imaging method and more on the expansion of the clinical examination. This provides the examiner with an additional tool for making reliable and optimal management decisions and for monitoring patients as needed.

Conventional comprehensive ultrasound, in contrast, is divided into various well-defined anatomical regions, like the abdomen, lung, vessels, nerves, heart, soft tissues, and musculoskeletal system and is performed by a physician specialized in the particular type of imaging at a specialized medical practice or ultrasound department. It includes comprehensive examination of an individual organ, an anatomical or functional unit or a region with reliable criteria to detect or rule out the presence of certain diseases/injuries. 2 articles in this issue provide examples of this. The study on the role of high-resolution ultrasound in the follow-up of cervical lymph nodes after RCT shows that intranodal necrosis and changes in the hilar vascularization pattern can be clearly visualized and accurate control of dynamic changes is possible in sonographic tumor follow-up. A further study shows that US-guided HIFU treatment can be reliably performed even in the case of locally advanced pancreatic cancer with involvement of the mesenteric vessels and extensive collateral circulation. A significant consideration regarding the quality of ultrasound is that the method is highly examiner-dependent. Therefore, a further study in this issue shows that the interobserver agreement for ESCULAP seems better than for CEUS-LI-RADS since the perception of contrast washout can vary greatly between individual examiners. The use of high-resolution ultrasound as an established and validated method thus allows more extensive differentiated diagnosis in the hands of experienced specialists and is also suitable for monitoring therapeutic measures.

There are 2 main directions or training programs in ultrasound: 1. Conventional comprehensive ultrasound which is performed by a specialist or at a specialized medical practice usually as a referral and 2. POCUS which is performed by the treating physician as a focused examination in real time at the patient’s bedside with immediate interpretation. Therefore, the differences essentially relate to the examination location, the qualifications of the examiner, and the scope and objective of the examination.

In this connection, it is necessary to determine whether POCUS poses a threat to conventional comprehensive ultrasound or represents a risk to the quality of ultrasound examinations. This concern is evidenced by the fact that POCUS is at the bottom of an examiner-expert pyramid. In this regard POCUS is viewed as acceptable for the intended purpose but is of lower quality than a complete ultrasound examination. Consequently, the fear is that POCUS will be used ubiquitously, resulting in a loss in quality and thereby lowering the value of the method. However, this does not take into consideration the fact that a limited examination cannot be equated a priori with a low examination quality in the way that a small circle only differs quantitatively and not qualitatively from a large circle. The learning pyramid is static and does not allow any space for the advantages of POCUS over comprehensive ultrasound. Therefore, for example, the speed and availability of ultrasound examinations are lost.

Consequently, there is no doubt that comprehensive ultrasound performed by a specialist is of great importance and cannot be replaced by POCUS. However, it is also correct that ultrasound performed by a specialist is only available on a limited basis and a complete examination is often not necessary or there is insufficient time for such an examination. 6 measures are needed to ensure that traditional comprehensive ultrasound and POCUS complement one another rather than compete with one another: 1. The concept of the conventional US learning pyramid must allow room for recognition of the similarities and differences between the methods and the fact that POCUS represents a new readily available but limited ultrasound method. 2. Standardized, evidence-based training curricula and standards for POCUS must be created and various expert levels for training must be defined. 3. Tutors need to be trained and training centers for those interested in POCUS must be provided. 4. Ultrasound experts need to develop guidelines as to when POCUS patients would profit from a referral to a specialist and should be involved in training. 5. It must be recognized that POCUS is not easier to perform even though POCUS examinations are faster and limited in their scope. The POCUS spectrum ranges from simple to complicated. 6. POCUS examiners must undergo good training and supervision, observe the POCUS principles, and avoid overinterpretation and misinterpretation.

Technological advancements in the form of mini-devices and hand-held devices ([Fig. 1]) is the industry’s response to the POCUS concept. Wireless probes can be connected via Bluetooth and WiFi to a screen (smartphone, tablet, etc.). Personalized ultrasound devices will reach a quality and price level in coming years that will allow even greater use. This development will have major effects on the clinical routine in that ultrasound will ultimately replace the stethoscope. This is also not a disadvantage but rather a sign of the potential of ultrasound. The clinical examination will experience a major increase in value. By using POCUS as a triage function, many important and fundamental diagnoses can be made or ruled out. The routine use of ultrasound in invasive interventions is inevitable and will increase safety for patients. Therefore, POCUS does not represent a risk for ultrasound or patients. Rather, POCUS provides a new opportunity. It provides the possibility of improving diagnostic imaging in the clinical routine. We must meet this challenge. Our 3 national societies anticipated the development of POCUS and its potential and with the creation of the emergency certificate established a first important principle. Emergency medicine is not the only area that can profit from POCUS. Except for, for example, psychiatry, prenatal diagnosis, and pediatric hip ultrasound, many areas of specialization can benefit from POCUS. Therefore, a new certificate of competency for POCUS, which is open to all physicians, was adopted by SGUM 1 year ago. It includes a range of areas of specialization (from anesthesia to orthopedics/rheumatology). Our 3 societies have the opportunity to provide all clinical physicians, whether general practitioner or specialist, with high-quality access to POCUS with the goal of perfecting the clinical examination and providing our patients with the best possible treatment. If we choose this path, it is important to know what the ultimate result of this new approach will be. According to the literature, POCUS can reduce the time to diagnosis, the number of CT examinations, and costs, for example. However, evidence of the effect on patient outcome such as mortality and morbidity is still lacking. Research in this area should be intensified – a task for our house journal.

Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Wireless pocket ultrasound device in use.

Abb. 1 Drahtloses Taschenkittel-Sonogerät in Anwendung.

POCUS – Chance oder Risiko?

Der Begriff „Point-of-Care-Ultrasonography“ (POCUS) ist heute in aller Munde. Er wird unterschiedlich verwendet und zum Beispiel häufig mit fokussierter Sonografie, Notfallsonografie oder Taschenkittelsonografie gleichgesetzt. Der zunehmende Einsatz von POCUS hat nicht nur zu einer großen Aufbruchstimmung und zu neuen Chancen für den Ultraschall geführt, sondern auch eine allgemeine Verunsicherung hervorgerufen. Von einigen Kolleginnen und Kollegen wird POCUS im Hinblick auf die Qualitätssicherung sogar als Bedrohung angesehen. Weil POCUS in Zukunft eine große Rolle im klinischen Alltag spielen wird, erscheint es wichtig, dass wir den Begriff einheitlich verstehen und verwenden. POCUS bedeutet Sonografie am Patientenbett und reicht von der „Locke bis zur Socke“. Sie fokussiert nicht nur auf die Makro-Anatomie und Pathologie, sondern erlaubt auch die direkte Beurteilung von funktionellen anatomischen Aspekten, der Physiologie, der Pathophysiologie und der Hämodynamik und hilft bei den Interventionen. Der behandelnde Arzt, aus diversen Fachbereichen kommend und interessiert an einer einzelnen Organpathologie, speziellen Krankheiten/Symptomen oder an einer Intervention, führt die Untersuchung in unterschiedlichen Situationen (Notfallaufnahme, Sprechstunde, Intensivstation, Operationssaal etc.) selbst in Echtzeit durch, entscheidet über deren Umfang und interpretiert laufend die erhobenen Befunde. Ein wesentliches, weiteres Element der POCUS ist das Konzept der fokussierten Sonografie. Fokussiert heißt, dass der Untersucher sich auf eine oder mehrere sonografische Ja-Nein-Fragestellungen (von einfach bis kompliziert) beschränkt und keine traditionell-umfassende Organ-, respektive regionale oder funktionelle Einheits-Untersuchung durchführt. Im Zentrum steht weniger der Ultraschall als isoliertes bildgebendes Diagnostikmittel, sondern die Erweiterung der klinischen Untersuchung. Der Untersucher verfügt damit über ein zusätzliches Element, um sicher und unverzüglich optimale Management-Entscheidungen zu treffen und die Patienten nach seinen Bedürfnissen zu monitorisieren.

Im Gegensatz dazu steht die traditionell-umfassende Sonografie. Sie wird in verschiedene wohl definierte anatomische Bereiche wie Abdomen, Lunge, Gefäße, Nerven, Herz, Weichteile und muskuloskelettales System aufgeteilt und von einem in der jeweiligen Bildgebung spezialisierten Arzt in einer Spezialarztpraxis oder Ultraschallabteilung durchgeführt. Sie beinhaltet eine umfassende Untersuchung eines einzelnen Organs, einer anatomischen oder funktionellen Einheit oder Region mit sicheren Kriterien für das Vorhandensein von bestimmten Krankheiten/Verletzungen oder deren Ausschluss. Als Beispiel hierzu genannt sind 2 Arbeiten in dieser Ausgabe. Die Studie zur Rolle der hochauflösenden Sonografie in der Nachsorge von Halslymphknoten nach abgeschlossener RCT zeigt, dass intranodale Nekrosen und Veränderungen des hilären Vaskularisationsmusters eindeutig dargestellt werden können und in der sonografischen Tumornachsorge eine akkurate Kontrolle dynamischer Veränderungen möglich ist. Eine weitere Arbeit zeigt, dass die US-gesteuerte HIFU-Therapie auch beim lokal fortgeschrittenen Pankreaskarzinom mit mesenterialer Gefäßbeteiligung und ausgeprägten Umgehungskreisläufen sicher möglich ist. Ein wesentlicher Aspekt im Hinblick auf die Qualität des Ultraschalls ist, dass es sich um eine Methode mit hoher Untersucher-Abhängigkeit handelt. So zeigt sich in einer weiteren Studie in diesem Heft auch, dass die Interobserver-Übereinstimmung für ESCULAP besser scheint als für CEUS-LI-RADS®, da die Wahrnehmung des Kontrastmittel-Auswaschens zwischen einzelnen Untersuchern stark variiert. Der Einsatz der hochauflösenden Sonografie als eine etablierte und validierte Methode erlaubt damit in erfahrenen Händen des Spezialisten eine weitergehende differenzierte Diagnostik und eignet sich auch zum Monitoring von therapeutischen Maßnahmen.

Zusammenfassend unterscheiden wir heute 2 große Richtungen bzw. Ausbildungswege in der Sonografie: 1. Die traditionell-umfassende Sonografie, welche von einem Spezialisten oder in einer Spezialpraxis, meist als Auftrag, ausgeführt wird und 2.POCUS, welche vom behandelnden Arzt selbst als fokussierte Untersuchung in Echtzeit am Patientenbett durchgeführt und direkt interpretiert wird. Die Unterschiede beziehen sich also im Wesentlichen auf den Untersuchungsort, die Qualifikation des Untersuchers und den Umfang sowie die Zielsetzung der Untersuchung.

In diesem Zusammenhang stellt sich nun die Frage, ob POCUS eine Bedrohung für den traditionell-umfassenden Ultraschall ist oder ein Risiko für die Qualität der Ultraschalluntersuchung darstellt? Ausdruck dieser Befürchtung ist, dass POCUS an unterster Stelle einer Untersucher-Experten-Pyramide steht. In diesem Sinne wird POCUS als akzeptabel für den beabsichtigten Zweck, aber von geringerer Qualität gegenüber einer vollständigen Untersuchung angesehen. In der Folge befürchtet man, dass POCUS ubiquitär angewendet zu einem Qualitätsverlust führen und dadurch die Methode abwerten könnte. Dabei wird jedoch außer Acht gelassen, dass eine definiert beschränkte Untersuchung a priori nicht mit einer niedrigeren Untersuchungsqualität gleichgesetzt werden darf, ähnlich wie sich ein kleiner Kreis nur quantitativ und nicht qualitativ von einem großen Kreis unterscheidet. Die Lern-Pyramide ist statisch und lässt keinen Raum für Vorteile zu, welche POCUS gegenüber dem vollständigen Ultraschall aufweist. So gehen z. B. Geschwindigkeit und Verfügbarkeit von Ultraschalluntersuchungen verloren.

Es steht somit außer Zweifel, dass der vollständige Spezialisten-Ultraschall eine große Bedeutung hat und nicht durch POCUS ersetzt werden kann. Aber genauso richtig ist, dass der Spezialisten-Ultraschall nur beschränkt verfügbar und häufig keine vollständige Untersuchung notwendig bzw. die Zeit dafür nicht vorhanden ist. Damit sich die traditionell-vollständige Sonografie und POCUS nicht konkurrenzieren, sondern sinnvoll ergänzen, sind 6 Maßnahmen notwendig: 1. Das Konzept der traditionellen US-Lernpyramide soll einer Vorstellung Platz machen, in welcher Ähnlichkeiten und Unterschiede gegenseitig anerkannt werden und POCUS ein neues Angebot darstellt als jederzeit verfügbarer, jedoch limitierter Ultraschall. 2. Es müssen einheitliche, evidenzbasierte Ausbildungscurricula und Standards für POCUS geschaffen und verschiedene Experten-Level für die Ausbildung definiert werden. 3. Es müssen Tutoren ausgebildet und Schulungszentren für POCUS-Interessierte angeboten werden. 4. Ultraschall-Experten sollen Richtlinien ausarbeiten, wann POCUS-Patienten von einer Überweisung an den Spezialisten profitieren und sich in der Ausbildung engagieren. 5. Anerkannt sein sollte, dass POCUS nicht leichter zu handhaben ist, auch wenn POCUS-Untersuchungen schneller und in ihrem Umfang beschränkt sind; die POCUS-Palette reicht von einfach bis kompliziert. 6. POCUS-Untersucher müssen eine gute Ausbildung und Supervision durchlaufen, sich an die POCUS-Prinzipien halten und vor Überschätzung sowie potenziell falschen Interpretationen hüten.

Der technologische Fortschritt mit Mini- und Handgeräten ([Abb. 1]) ist die Antwort der Industrie auf das POCUS-Konzept. Drahtlose Sonden können via Bluetooth und Wifi mit einem Bildschirm (Smartphone, Tablet etc.) verbunden werden. Personalisierte Ultraschall-Geräte werden in den nächsten Jahren qualitativ und preislich ein Niveau erreichen, welches zu einer weiteren Verbreitung führt. Diese Entwicklung wird große Auswirkungen auf unseren klinischen Alltag haben, indem der Ultraschall das Stethoskop ablöst. Auch dies ist kein Nachteil, sondern ein Zeichen dafür, welches Potenzial im Ultraschall steckt. Die klinische Untersuchung wird eine große Aufwertung erfahren. Mit POCUS im Sinne einer Triage-Funktion können so bereits viele wichtige und grundlegende Diagnosen gestellt oder ausgeschlossen werden. Der routinemäßige Einsatz des Ultraschalls bei invasiven Interventionen ist vorprogrammiert und erhöht die Sicherheit für die Patienten. POCUS stellt also weder eine Bedrohung für den Ultraschall noch die Patienten dar. Vielmehr bietet POCUS eine neue Chance. Sie eröffnet die Möglichkeit zur verbesserten Diagnostik in der klinischen Alltagsarbeit. Dieser Herausforderung gilt es, sich zu stellen. Unsere 3 Ländergesellschaften haben die POCUS-Entwicklung und ihr Potenzial vorausgesehen und gemeinsam mit der Schaffung des Notfallzertifikats ein erstes wichtiges Fundament geschaffen. Die Notfallmedizin ist nicht der einzige Fachbereich, welcher von POCUS profitieren kann. Viele Fachbereiche, außer z. B. die Psychiatrie, Pränataldiagnostik und kindliche Hüftsonografie, fallen darunter. In der SGUM wurde daher vor 1 Jahr ein neuer Fähigkeitsausweis POCUS, der allen Ärzten offensteht, verabschiedet. Er besteht aus einer Auswahl mehrerer Fach-Komponenten (von der Anästhesie bis zur Orthopädie/Rheumatologie). Unsere 3 Gesellschaften haben die Möglichkeit, allen praktisch tätigen Ärzten, ob Generalisten oder Spezialisten, einen qualitativ hohen Zugang zum Universalinstrument POCUS zu ermöglichen mit dem Ziel, die klinische Untersuchung zu perfektionieren und unseren Patienten die bestmögliche Behandlung anbieten zu können. Wenn wir uns für diesen Weg entscheiden, ist es wichtig zu wissen, was dieser neue Ansatz letztlich bringt. Aus der Literatur geht hervor, dass POCUS z. B. die Abklärungszeiten, CT-Untersuchungen und Kosten reduzieren kann. Der Nachweis von Auswirkungen auf das Patienten-Outcome wie Mortalität und Morbidität fehlt jedoch noch. Die Forschung auf diesem Gebiet sollte intensiviert werden – eine Aufgabe für unsere Hauszeitschrift.

Zoom Image
Sevgi Tercanli
Zoom Image
Joseph Osterwalder

#
#

Correspondence

Prof. em. Dr. med. Joseph Osterwalder
Scheffelstrasse 1
9000 St. Gallen
Schweiz   
Phone: ++ 41/78/4 08 91 39   


Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Wireless pocket ultrasound device in use.

Abb. 1 Drahtloses Taschenkittel-Sonogerät in Anwendung.
Zoom Image
Sevgi Tercanli
Zoom Image
Joseph Osterwalder