CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Laryngorhinootologie 2018; 97(S 02): S250-S251
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1640579
Abstracts
Otologie: Otology
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Active and passive processing of novel acoustic stimuli in cochlear-implant patients: An EEG study

I Schierholz
1  HNO-Klinik der Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Deutschland
,
C Schönermark
2  HNO-Klinik der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover, Hannover
,
B Kopp
3  Neurologie-Klinik der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover, Hannover
,
T Lenarz
4  HNO-Klinik der Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover
,
A Kral
5  VIANNA, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover
,
E Ruigendijk
6  Institut für Niederlandistik, Carl-von-Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg
,
A Büchner
4  HNO-Klinik der Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover
› Author Affiliations
DFG Exzellenzcluster EXC 1077/1 "Hearing4all"
Further Information
Dr. Irina Schierholz
Medizinische Hochschule Hannover,
Carl-Neuberg-Straße, 130625,
Hannover,
Deutschland   

Publication History

Publication Date:
18 April 2018 (online)

 
 

    Introduction:

    To adequately process novel acoustic stimuli in the environment, a good balance between bottom-up and top-down processes is needed. Only in this way one can appropriately react to these stimuli and possible threats can be detected in time. The interaction between bottom-up and top-down processes in cochlear-implant (CI) patients, and its influence on CI performance are not well understood yet.

    Methods:

    In the study, 20 CI patients and 20 normal-hearing (NH) controls performed a three-stimulus oddball paradigm, including standard (70%), target/deviant (15%), and unique environmental sounds (15%). The task was carried out once actively and once passively. During the task, electroencephalography (EEG) and behavioral data were recorded, which were compared between groups and conditions.

    Results:

    Initial data point to an attenuated sensory processing in CI patients, whereby the cognitive processing seems comparable to the NH. Both, CI patients and NH show a bottom-up-related early and a top-down-related late Novelty-P3, with the late Novelty-P3 being reduced in the passive condition for both groups. Group differences show up for the amplitudes of the early, but not the late Novelty P3.

    Conclusions:

    The current study enables the objective comparison of the active and passive processing of novel acoustic stimuli in CI patients. The observed impairment in bottom-up processes for CI-degraded listening, and the simultaneous preserved top-down processing suggest a shift of the balance in CI patients in contrast to NH.


    #

    No conflict of interest has been declared by the author(s).

    Dr. Irina Schierholz
    Medizinische Hochschule Hannover,
    Carl-Neuberg-Straße, 130625,
    Hannover,
    Deutschland