Endoscopy 2018; 50(09): 846-860
DOI: 10.1055/a-0577-3500
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Effect of Endocuff-assisted colonoscopy on adenoma detection rate: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Nicolas Williet
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
2  EA 7425 HESPER, Health Services and Performance Research, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France
,
Quentin Tournier
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
,
Chloé Vernet
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
,
Olivier Dumas
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
,
Leslie Rinaldi
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
,
Xavier Roblin
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
,
Jean-Marc Phelip
1  Hepatogastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
2  EA 7425 HESPER, Health Services and Performance Research, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France
,
Mathieu Pioche
3  Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted 18 October 2017

accepted after revision 23 January 2018

Publication Date:
26 April 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Yield of Endocuff-assisted colonoscopy (EAC) compared with standard colonoscopy is conflicting in terms of adenoma detection rate (ADR). A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) appears necessary.

Methods PubMed and Google Scholar were searched in December 2017. Abstracts from Digestive Disease Week and United European Gastroenterology Week meetings were also searched to 2017. All RCTs comparing EAC with standard colonoscopy were included. Analysis was conducted by using the Mantel–Haenszel models. Heterogeneity was quantified using the I 2 test.

Results Of the 265 articles reviewed, 12 RCTs were included, with a total of 8376 patients (EAC group 4225; standard colonoscopy group 4151). In the meta-analysis, ADR was significantly increased in the EAC group vs. the standard colonoscopy group (41.3 % vs. 34.2 %; risk ratio [RR] = 1.20, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 1.36; P = 0.003; I 2 = 79 %), especially for operators with low-to-moderate ADRs (< 35 %): RR = 1.51, 95 %CI 1.35 to 1.69; P < 0.001; I 2 = 43 %). In contrast, this benefit was not reached for operators with high ADRs (> 45 %): RR = 1.01, 95 %CI 0.93 to 1.09; P = 0.87; I 2 = 0.0 %). The mean number of adenomas per patient tended to be higher with EAC (mean difference = 0.11 adenomas/patient, 95 %CI – 0.17 to 0.38). Similar results were shown for polyp detection rates (61.6 % vs. 51.4 %; RR = 1.20, 95 %CI 1.06 to 1.36; P = 0.004). Use of the Endocuff did not impact the cecal intubation rate (95.1 % vs. 95.7 %; P = 0.08), or the procedure time compared with standard colonoscopy. Adverse events related to Endocuff were rare and exclusively mild mucosal erosion (4.0 %; 95 %CI 2.0 % to 8.0 %).

Conclusion With moderate-quality evidence, this study showed an improvement in ADR with EAC without major adverse events, especially for operators with low-to-moderate ADRs.

Table e1 – e2, Figs. e4, e6, e7, e9 – e12