Fortschr Röntgenstr 2019; 191(03): 192-198
DOI: 10.1055/a-0636-4129
Review
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Dental Imaging – A basic guide for the radiologist

Article in several languages: English | deutsch
Max Masthoff
1  Institute of Clinical Radiology, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
,
Mirjam Gerwing
1  Institute of Clinical Radiology, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
,
Malte Masthoff
2  Dental Group Practice Masthoff and Trapmann, Marl, Germany
,
Maximilian Timme
3  Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
,
Johannes Kleinheinz
3  Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
,
Markus Berninger
4  Department of Trauma Surgery, BG Trauma Center Murnau, Germany
,
Walter Heindel
1  Institute of Clinical Radiology, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
,
Moritz Wildgruber
1  Institute of Clinical Radiology, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
,
Christoph Schülke
1  Institute of Clinical Radiology, Medical Faculty – University of Muenster – and University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

22 February 2018

04 May 2018

Publication Date:
18 June 2018 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background As dental imaging accounts for approximately 40 % of all X-ray examinations in Germany, profound knowledge of this topic is essential not only for the dentist but also for the clinical radiologist. This review focuses on basic imaging findings regarding the teeth. Therefore, tooth structure, currently available imaging techniques and common findings in conserving dentistry including endodontology, periodontology, implantology and dental trauma are presented.

Methods Literature research on the current state of dental radiology was performed using Pubmed.

Results and Conclusion Currently, the most frequent imaging techniques are the orthopantomogram (OPG) and single-tooth radiograph, as well as computer tomography (CT) and cone beam CT mainly for implantology (planning or postoperative control) or trauma indications. Especially early diagnosis and correct classification of a dental trauma, such as dental pulp involvement, prevents from treatment delays or worsening of therapy options and prognosis. Furthermore, teeth are commonly a hidden focus of infection.

Since radiologists are frequently confronted with dental imaging, either concerning a particular question such as a trauma patient or regarding incidental findings throughout head and neck imaging, further training in this field is more than worthwhile to facilitate an early and sufficient dental treatment.

Key points

  1. This review focuses on dental imaging techniques and the most important pathologies.

  2. Dental pathologies may not only be locally but also systemically relevant.

  3. Reporting of dental findings is important for best patient care.

Citation Format

  • Masthoff M, Gerwing M, Masthoff M et al. Dental Imaging – A basic guide for the radiologist. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2019; 191: 192 – 198