Endoscopy 2019; 51(04): E73-E74
DOI: 10.1055/a-0824-6162
E-Videos
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Tube-assisted suction: a novel technique for removing massive food residue during gastroscopy

Xianhui Zeng*
Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
,
Ping Yan*
Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
,
Liansong Ye
Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
,
Linjie Guo
Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
,
Nianhong Wu
Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
,
Bing Hu
Department of Gastroenterology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
18 January 2019 (eFirst)

A 44-year-old man with achalasia was scheduled to undergo peroral endoscopic myotomy for recurrence after Heller myotomy. Massive food residue was observed in the lower esophagus, despite repeated and adequate fasting ([Fig. 1]). Repeated irrigation and suction by the endoscope (GIF-Q260J; Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) failed to remove the food residue. Grasping forceps (basket type, FG-16L-1; Olympus) did not work either. Therefore, tube-assisted suction was performed ([Video 1]).

Zoom Image
Fig. 1 Massive food residue in the lower esophagus despite sufficient fasting.

Video 1 Tube-assisted suction for the removal of massive food residue during gastroscopy.


Quality:

A soft, plastic tube (outer diameter 5 mm) with several side apertures was tied along the side of the scope. The head of the tube was positioned approximately 3 mm beyond the tip of the scope ([Fig. 2]). The other end of the tube was connected to a vacuum extractor. Then, the scope with the attached tube was inserted smoothly. When the food residue was observed, irrigating and suction were continued until no food residue remained. Eventually, a clear field was achieved ([Fig. 3]).

Zoom Image
Fig. 2 A soft, plastic tube was tied along the side of the scope.
Zoom Image
Fig. 3 A clear field, free from food residue, was achieved with the suction device.

Patients who undergo endoscopy after gastric surgery usually have some food residue [1] [2] [3], similarly to patients with achalasia, which interferes with endoscopic observation and detection of lesions [2]. No specific method has been reported to remove massive food residue during gastroscopy. Patient preparation for the day before the endoscopic procedures is emphasized: sufficient fasting time (more than 18 hours) [3] and a liquid diet plus gastrokinetic agents (i. e. cisapride, domperidone, and aclatonium napadisilate) [2]. However, attempts to obtain a satisfactory field may still end in failure. Tube-assisted suction is a novel technique to solve this problem. The tube is a common vacuum suction tube that is available in most medical institutions. This technique minimizes discomfort resulted from repeated fasting. Furthermore, use of this simple addition may avoid a delay in emergency endoscopic treatment or having to postpone treatment.

In conclusion, we believe that tube-assisted suction is an effective, simple, and timesaving way for removing massive food residue.

Endoscopy_UCTN_Code_TTT_1AO_2AN

Endoscopy E-Videos is a free access online section, reporting on interesting cases and new techniques in gastroenterological endoscopy. All papers include a high quality video and all contributions are freely accessible online.
This section has its own submission website at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/e-videos

* These authors contributed equally to this work.