CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Endosc Int Open 2020; 08(01): E13-E19
DOI: 10.1055/a-1024-3759
Original article
Owner and Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2020

Dye-based chromoendoscopy following polypectomy reduces incomplete polyp resection

Neil R. O’Morain
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
2  Trinity Academic Gastroenterology Group, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
,
Mohd I. Syafiq
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
2  Trinity Academic Gastroenterology Group, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
,
Ammar Shahin
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
,
Barbara Ryan
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
2  Trinity Academic Gastroenterology Group, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
,
Stephen Crowther
3  Department of Histopathology, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
,
Deirdre McNamara
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
2  Trinity Academic Gastroenterology Group, Tallaght University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted 03 October 2018

accepted after revision 29 July 2019

Publication Date:
08 January 2020 (online)

  

Abstract

Background and study aims The completeness of a polyp resection is an important determinant of quality in colonoscopy, and may reduce incidence of interval cancers. Incomplete resection rates (IRR) vary widely and range from 6.5 % to 22.7 %. Residual disease is more likely with larger polyps, for sessile serrated adenomas, and with more proximal lesions. Chromoendoscopy is increasingly employed in lesion detection. The aims of this study were to assess local IRR, and to determine whether chromoendoscopy could correctly identify residual disease post polypectomy.

Patients and methods This was a prospective study examining post polypectomy sites. Chromoendoscopy (0.13 % indigo carmine) was applied to resection bases to identify residual disease. Targeted base biopsies were taken from identified residual disease (positive group) or random base biopsies were taken when a clear base was visualised (negative group). Overall rates of incomplete resection were documented. Reported rates post chromoendoscopy and actual histological rates were documented and compared.

Results A total of 102 polyps were identified for inclusion, of which 15 % (n = 16) were excluded. Resection quality was evaluated in 86 polyps of 61 patients (female n = 33 54 %; mean Age 62.3 years). Polyps were mainly removed by cold snare (n = 71, 82.5 %). Most polyps (n = 58, 67 %) measured between 5 to 10 mm. Polyps were largely located in the right colon (n = 57, 66 %). Overall histological residual disease occurred in 17 /86 (19.6 %). Chromoendoscopy correctly identified residual disease in 13 of 17 bases (76.5 %). Only four of /86 (4.6 %) of polyp bases were missclassified post-chromoendoscopy (odds ratio 0.284 (95 % CI 0.0857–0.9409), P = 0.03).

Conclusion Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy improves early detection of residual disease post polypectomy, reducing incomplete resection rates.