Drug Res (Stuttg) 2020; 70(12): 583-592
DOI: 10.1055/a-1252-2322
Original Article

Transition Metal Chelation Augments the Half-life of Secnidazole: Molecular Docking and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Approaches

1   Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh
1   Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh
,
Mohammad A. Rashid
1   Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh
,
Md. Zakir Sultan
2   Centre for Advanced Research in Sciences (CARS), University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

This current research aimed to establish the most required pharmacodynamics parameters of two transition metal complexes of an antimicrobial drug secnidazole. The spectroscopic fluorescence quenching strategy was outlined to evaluate the binding mechanism and binding affinity of nickel (II) and chromium (III) complexes of secnidazole with bovine serum albumin (BSA). The conformational modifications and the interacting patterns of the protein due to the interaction of the parent compound of the metal complexes have been investigated by molecular docking approach. The ligand-protein interactions were confirmed by the spectral quelling of the serum protein’s intensity in the presence of metal chelate of secnidazole. The quenching mechanism was an endothermic dynamic process. The calculated thermodynamic factors delineated van der Waals interactions mainly influenced the spontaneous process. The UV-fluorescence curves were studied to establish the energy transformation profile according to the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory. The double-logarithm plot exhibited the binding number that ensured the drug-protein interaction was at a 1:1 ratio. The compared binding constants dictated that both metal chelates gained higher binding affinity, longer half-life, and achieved the capacity to show the pharmacological effects by a lower dose than the parent molecule.



Publication History

Received: 16 July 2020

Accepted: 30 August 2020

Article published online:
23 October 2020

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