Endoscopy 2021; 53(07): E273-E274
DOI: 10.1055/a-1261-2944
E-Videos

Can artificial intelligence help to detect dysplasia in patients with ulcerative colitis?

Yasuharu Maeda
1  Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
,
Shin-ei Kudo
1  Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
,
Noriyuki Ogata
1  Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
,
Masashi Misawa
1  Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
,
Yuichi Mori
1  Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
,
Kensaku Mori
2  Graduate School of Informatics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
,
Kazuo Ohtsuka
3  Endoscopy Department, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
› Author Affiliations

A 72-year-old man with an 18-year history of pancolitis had been visiting our hospital regularly for 12 years. He was taking oral mesalamine and mercaptopurine to sustain clinical remission. Surveillance colonoscopy was performed using high-definition endoscopy (CF-HQ290ZI; Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) with an artificial intelligence (AI)-based detection system (EndoBRAIN-EYE; Cybernet Systems, Tokyo, Japan).

The AI-based detection system identified two lesions in the sigmoid colon ([Fig. 1 a, b]) and indicated them with bounding boxes ([Video 1]).

Zoom Image
Fig. 1 The artificial intelligence-based detection system identified dysplasia. a First lesion. b Second lesion.

Video 1 At the moment the artificial intelligence-based detection system identified the dysplasia, it displayed the four corners of the monitor in yellow and indicated boxes bounding the dysplasia.


Quality:

Histological examination of the biopsy specimens showed that both of the lesions were characterized by low-grade dysplasia ([Fig. 2 a, b]).

Zoom Image
Fig. 2 Histological examination showed an atypical tubular gland with low-grade dysplasia. a First lesion. b Second lesion.

Patients with longstanding ulcerative colitis (UC) have a higher risk of colorectal cancer than do individuals in the general population [1]. UC-associated dysplasia is often flat with an unclear boundary from the surrounding tissues, making it difficult to detect [2]. AI-based polyp detection systems are used during colonoscopy to increase lesion detection [3]. The EndoBRAIN-EYE system can reportedly identify colorectal lesions with high accuracy in non-UC patients [4] [5]. However, its use for the detection of dysplasia in patients with UC has not been previously reported.

With a target biopsy strategy in UC surveillance, the ability to detect lesions depends on the endoscopist. AI has the potential to help non-expert endoscopists detect dysplasia in patients with UC.

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Publication History

Publication Date:
01 October 2020 (online)

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