CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Endoscopy 2022; 54(06): 574-579
DOI: 10.1055/a-1554-0976
Innovations and brief communications

Magnets and a self-retractable wire for endoscopic septotomies: from concept to first-in-human use

1   Bio, Electro and Mechanical Systems Department, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
,
Ricardo Rio-Tinto
2   Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
,
Nicolas Cauche
3   Brussels Medical Device Center, Brussels, Belgium
,
Sonia Dugardeyn
4   Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
,
Cécilia Delattre
3   Brussels Medical Device Center, Brussels, Belgium
,
Charlotte Sandersen
5   Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
,
Laureen Rocq
6   Department of Pathology, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
,
Pauline van Ouytsel
4   Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
,
Alain Delchambre
1   Bio, Electro and Mechanical Systems Department, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
,
Jacques Devière
2   Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
4   Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
,
Daniel Blero
4   Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
› Author Affiliations
Supported by: Innoviris Brussels RBC/2017-SOIB-9

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Registration number (trial ID): NCT04480216 Type of study: Feasibility and safety

Abstract

Background A medical device that allows simple and safe performance of an endoscopic septotomy could have several applications in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We have developed such a device by combining two magnets and a self-retractable wire to perform a progressive septotomy by compression of the tissues. We describe here the concept, preclinical studies, and first clinical use of the device for the treatment of symptomatic epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum (EED).

Methods The MAGUS (MAgnetic Gastrointestinal Universal Septotome) device was designed based on previous knowledge of compression anastomosis and currently unmet needs. After initial design, the feasibility of the technique was tested on artificial septa in pigs. A clinical trial was then initiated to assess the feasibility and safety of the technique.

Results Animal studies showed that the MAGUS can perform a complete septotomy at various levels of the GI tract. In two patients with a symptomatic EED, uneventful complete septotomy was observed within 28 and 39 days after the endoscopic procedure.

Conclusions This new system provides a way of performing endoluminal septotomy in a single procedure. It appears to be effective and safe for managing symptomatic EED. Further clinical applications where this type of remodeling of the GI tract could be beneficial are under investigation.



Publication History

Received: 15 April 2021

Accepted after revision: 20 July 2021

Accepted Manuscript online:
19 July 2021

Article published online:
29 October 2021

© 2021. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

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