Endoscopy 2014; 46(01): 66-69
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1344890
Innovations and brief communications
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Colonic diverticular hemorrhage: the hood method for detecting responsible diverticula and endoscopic band ligation for hemostasis

Soichiro Shibata
1  Department of Gastroenterology, Shinshu Ueda Medical Center, Ueda, Nagano, Japan
2  Second Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
,
Takashi Shigeno
1  Department of Gastroenterology, Shinshu Ueda Medical Center, Ueda, Nagano, Japan
,
Kazuya Fujimori
1  Department of Gastroenterology, Shinshu Ueda Medical Center, Ueda, Nagano, Japan
,
Keita Kanai
1  Department of Gastroenterology, Shinshu Ueda Medical Center, Ueda, Nagano, Japan
2  Second Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
,
Kaname Yoshizawa
1  Department of Gastroenterology, Shinshu Ueda Medical Center, Ueda, Nagano, Japan
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Publikationsverlauf

submitted 18. November 2012

accepted after revision20. August 2013

Publikationsdatum:
11.November 2013 (eFirst)

Background and study aims: Although colonic diverticular hemorrhage is a common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, the low rate of detection of the diverticula responsible for bleeding, together with inadequate evaluation of endoscopic hemostasis, remain unsatisfactory.

Patients and methods: Over 3 years, we employed the hood method to diagnose diverticular hemorrhage in 53 patients and applied endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for hemostasis in 27 patients with responsible diverticula.

Results: The hood method revealed active bleeding in 13 patients (24.5 %), nonbleeding visible vessels in 14 patients (26.4 %), and presumptive diverticular hemorrhage in 26 patients (49.1 %). The nonbleeding visible vessels were located in the diverticular dome in 13 patients and at the diverticular orifice in one patient. EBL was performed in 27 patients, and a hemostasis rate of 96.3 % was achieved. In 9 of 12 patients treated with EBL, follow-up colonoscopy revealed resolution of the responsible diverticula.

Conclusions: The hood method improves the detection rate of diverticula responsible for bleeding by revealing potential nonbleeding visible vessels in the diverticular dome. EBL may become an effective procedure for hemostasis of colonic diverticular hemorrhage.