Endoscopy 2015; 47(08): 710-718
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1391732
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Endoscopic mucosal resection of laterally spreading lesions involving the ileocecal valve: technique, risk factors for failure, and outcomes

Kavinderjit S. Nanda
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
,
Nicholas Tutticci
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
,
Nicholas G. Burgess
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
2  Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
,
Rebecca Sonson
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
,
Stephen J. Williams
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
,
Michael J. Bourke
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
2  Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted: 13 October 2014

accepted after revision: 14 January 2015

Publication Date:
12 March 2015 (online)

Background and study aims: Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of laterally spreading lesions (LSLs) involving the ileocecal valve (ICV) is technically demanding. Conventionally, these lesions are considered too challenging for endoscopic therapy and are primarily managed surgically. The aims of the study were to describe effectiveness, safety, and outcomes following EMR of LSLs at the ICV.

Patients and methods: This was a single-center, prospective, observational, cohort study performed at an academic, tertiary referral center. Patients undergoing EMR for LSLs ≥ 20 mm involving the ICV were recruited over a 5-year period. Standard or cap-assisted colonoscopy with inject-and-resect EMR technique was performed with standardized post-EMR management. Procedural success, safety, and outcomes compared with non-ICV LSLs managed during the same period were analyzed.

Results: A total of 53 patients with ICV LSLs were referred for EMR (median age 69 years; median lesion size 35.0 mm; 52.8 % females). Six patients went directly to surgery because of an endoscopic diagnosis of malignancy (n = 2) or technical failure of EMR (n = 4). EMR achieved complete adenoma clearance in 44 out of 47 attempted (93.6 %). Surgery was ultimately avoided in 43/53 (81.1 %). Complications included bleeding in 6.4 %. There were no perforations or strictures. Early adenoma recurrence was detected in 7/40 patients (17.5 %), and 1/22 (4.5 %) had late recurrence. All were successfully managed endoscopically. Factors associated with failure of ICV EMR were ileal infiltration and involvement of both ICV lips.

Conclusions: In the majority of cases, LSL involving the ICV can be effectively treated by EMR on an outpatient basis. In specialized centers, complications are infrequent, and > 80 % of patients ultimately avoid surgery.

Trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01368289).