Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2017; 65(01): 031-035
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1584136
Short Communication
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Using 3D Physical Modeling to Plan Surgical Corrections of Complex Congenital Heart Defects

Janez Vodiskar
1  Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Unikilnik RWTH Aaachen, Aachen, Germany
,
Maximilian Kütting
2  Department of Cardiovascular Engineering, Institute of Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholz Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
,
Ulrich Steinseifer
2  Department of Cardiovascular Engineering, Institute of Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholz Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
,
Jaime Francisco Vazquez-Jimenez
1  Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Unikilnik RWTH Aaachen, Aachen, Germany
,
Simon J. Sonntag
2  Department of Cardiovascular Engineering, Institute of Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholz Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 October 2015

11 April 2016

Publication Date:
13 May 2016 (online)

Abstract

Background Understanding the anatomy and physiology of congenital heart defects is crucial for planning interventions in these patients. Congenital heart procedures often involve complex three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. Excellent imaging techniques are required to depict all anatomical details. We have used and evaluated fast 3D prototyping technology for reconstruction and planning of corrections of complex congenital heart defects.

Materials and Methods 3D physical models were constructed from contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) datasets of patients with complex congenital heart defect. Two different commercially available printing technologies were used and their clinical application compared.

Results Physical models of three different patients were used for preoperative surgical planning. All models showed good correspondence to patient anatomy. Both printing technologies gave excellent results.

Conclusion Physical models could be easily constructed with the use of CT datasets. The printing process could be done efficiently, quite rapidly, and cost effectively. Surgical corrections could be planned based on these models.