CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · AJP Rep 2019; 09(01): e1-e5
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1677051
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Persistence of Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy among Nulliparous Versus Parous Women

Rodney A. McLaren Jr.
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York
,
Kate W.-C. Chang
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Nana-Ama E. Ankumah
3  Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
,
Lynda J.-S. Yang
2  Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
,
Suneet P. Chauhan
3  Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
› Author Affiliations
Funding The authors do not report any financial disclosures.
Further Information

Publication History

18 September 2017

29 November 2018

Publication Date:
04 January 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Objective Our objective was to compare persistence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) at 1 and 2 years in children of nulliparous versus parous women.

Study Design We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children diagnosed with NBPP followed at the University of Michigan, Interdisciplinary Brachial Plexus Program (UM-BPP). Self-reported demographics, delivery history, including birth weight (BW) < versus ≥ 9 lbs, and presence of shoulder dystocia (SD) were recorded. Student's t-test and Chi-square test with odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for comparisons of maternal, neonatal, and peripartum characteristics.

Results Of 337 children with NBPP, 43% (146) were of nulliparas and 57% (191) of multiparas. At 1 year, children with persistent NBPP were similar in both groups (87% vs. 88%, aOR 1.357, 95% CI: 0.297–6.208). Persistent NBPP was not significantly different among nulliparous and multiparous women at 2 years (97% vs. 92% respectively, aOR 0.079, 95% CI: 0.006–1.050).

Conclusion In one of the largest cohorts of NBPP, maternal parity did not influence the likelihood of NBPP persistence at 1 and 2 years.

Note

Presented as a poster presentation at Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; Las Vegas, Nevada, October 27–28, 2016.