Facial plast Surg 2019; 35(01): 085-089
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1677708
Original Research
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Relationship of Sociodemographic Factors and Outcomes in Functional Rhinoplasty

Brian Nuyen
1  Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Emily A. Spataro
2  Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Cristen Olds
1  Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Cherian K. Kandathil
1  Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
,
Sam P. Most
2  Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
17 January 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

The objective of this article was to compare the effect of such sociodemographic factors as gender, age, marital status, employment status, race, and income on short- and long-term rhinoplasty outcomes using a validated disease-specific instrument—Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale, as well as complication and revision rates. Patients who underwent a functional (+/− cosmetic) rhinoplasty with the senior author between January, 1 2012, and September 9, 2017, and had both a preoperative and at least one postoperative NOSE score, were included in the study. Sociodemographic variables of binary gender, age, marital status, employment status, race, and income based on zip code were collected. The primary outcomes were the differences between the preoperative and postoperative NOSE scores with short-term (less than 3 months) and longer-term (greater than 3 months) follow-up. Secondary outcomes were general complications and specifically revision surgery. Standard descriptive statistics, as well as univariable linear and logistic regressions, were conducted with each outcome measure. A total of 341 patients were included in this study. No individual patient-level variables were found to significantly affect the short- or longer-term average change in NOSE scores, although older age trended toward significance in longer-term average change in NOSE scores (p = 0.07). No factors significantly affected the rate of complications or revision surgery in this cohort. The authors found improvement in NOSE scores after rhinoplasty was not related to factors of age, gender, race, employment status, income, and marital status. This cohort also did not demonstrate differential rates in complications or revision surgery based on sociodemographic variables.