Thorac cardiovasc Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1683998
Original Cardiovascular
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Severe Calcification of the Ascending Aorta Detected Incidentally in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

Mohamed Salem
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Baland Mohammad
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Katharina Huenges
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Christine Friedrich
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Bernd Panholzer
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Jochen Cremer
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
,
Assad Hanyea
1  Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

10 January 2019

14 February 2019

Publication Date:
04 April 2019 (online)

Abstract

Background Incidentally discovered severe calcified ascending aorta (CAA) is a major challenge faced by surgeons during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome in patients undergoing cardiac surgery in this condition with the additional replacement of the CAA.

Methods A retrospective study on a cohort of 74 patients (28.4% females; mean age: 73 ± 7 years) underwent cardiac surgery and initial replacement of an incidentally discovered CAA using moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest. A control group was matched according to age, gender, and procedure.

Results No significant differences were noted with regard to preoperative risk factors. Due to the additional replacement of CAA, the extracorporeal circulation and cross-clamping time were significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.001). Postoperatively, no significant differences in complications were observed between the groups. There was no significant difference in regard to incidence of neurologic adverse events (5.4 vs. 2.7%; p = 0.68) or 30-day mortality (6.7 vs. 4.1%; p = 0.72).

Conclusion Our study showed that the initial replacement of incidental CAA in patients undergoing cardiac surgery was not associated with increased risks for neurologic adverse events and mortality.