Semin Speech Lang
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1688695
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Social Network Structure in Young Stroke Survivors with Aphasia: A Case Series Report

Charles Ellis
1  Communication Equity and Outcomes Laboratory, College of Allied Health Sciences East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
2  Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
,
Rhiannon Phillips
2  Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
,
Tina Hill
3  Vidant Medical Center, Greenville, North Carolina
,
Patrick M. Briley
1  Communication Equity and Outcomes Laboratory, College of Allied Health Sciences East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
2  Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
25 April 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to profile the social networks of young adult stroke survivors with aphasia. A case series approach using four persons with aphasia (PWA) younger than 50 years was utilized. Semistructured interviews were completed with the PWA and their primary caregiver/family to explore the most salient relationships in the PWA's social network. PWAs in this study exhibited very small social networks with the most salient relationships consisting of immediate family members. Mothers were the primary caregiver for the two most impaired PWA. Prestroke friendships were dissolved or reduced at the onset of aphasia. The most impaired PWAs spent most of their days in isolation without a consistent communication partner. This study suggests young adult stroke survivors with aphasia have significant changes in their social network structure after stroke, but it is unclear if the observed change in social network structure is more related to age or level of communication impairment.

Financial Disclosures

This study is funded by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Grant no. 1 R03 HS025043–01A1 to the first author.


Nonfinancial Disclosures

No nonfinancial relationships exist.