J Neurol Surg B Skull Base 2020; 81(05): 579-584
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1693700
Original Article

Sellar Remodeling after Surgery for Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma: Intercarotid Distance as a Predictor of Recurrence.

1  Edinburgh Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
2  Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Hannah D. Flower
1  Edinburgh Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Patrick F. X. Statham
3  Department of Clinical Neurosciences, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Paul M. Brennan
1  Edinburgh Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
3  Department of Clinical Neurosciences, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
,
Mark A. Hughes
1  Edinburgh Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
3  Department of Clinical Neurosciences, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Introduction As they grow, pituitary adenoma can remodel the sella turcica and alter anatomical relationships with adjacent structures. The intercarotid distance (ICD) at the level of the sella is a measure of sella width. The purpose of this study was to (1) assess how ICD changes after transsphenoidal surgery and (2) explore whether the extent of ICD change is associated with tumor recurrence.

Methods A retrospective analysis of preoperative and postoperative coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans was carried out by two independent assessors on patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas. Preoperative tumor volume and any change in ICD following surgery were recorded and compared between groups. Logistic regression models of recurrence were generated.

Results In 36 of 42 patients, ICD fell after surgery (mean = 1.8 mm) and six cases were static. At time of follow-up (mean = 77 months), 25 had not required further intervention and 17 had undergone second surgery or radiosurgery. In patients in whom no further intervention has yet been necessary, the postoperative reduction in ICD was significantly smaller than in those who required repeat intervention (1.1 vs. 2.7 mm respectively, p < 0.01). ICD decrease was weakly correlated with tumor volume (r = 0.35). ICD decrease was a significant predictor of recurrence (odds ratio [OR] = 3.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.44–6.87), largely independent of tumor volume.

Conclusion For most patients, ICD falls following surgical excision of a nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma. A greater reduction in ICD postsurgery appears to predict recurrence. Change in ICD shows promise as a radiographic tool for prognosticating clinical course after surgery.



Publication History

Received: 05 March 2019

Accepted: 03 June 2019

Publication Date:
24 July 2019 (online)

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Stuttgart · New York