J Pediatr Neurol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697041
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Sydenham's Chorea; Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings, a Retrospective Observational Study in Children

Fatma Hanci
1  Department of Pediatrics, Division of child neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey
,
Mustafa Hizal
2  Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey
,
Sevim Türay
1  Department of Pediatrics, Division of child neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey
,
Oya Kalaycioğlu
3  Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey
,
Nimet Kabakuş
1  Department of Pediatrics, Division of child neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

17 May 2019

23 July 2019

Publication Date:
18 September 2019 (online)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and demographic and clinical characteristics, response to treatment times, and recurrence rates of Sydenham's chorea (SC), the most common of the acquired pediatric choreas. The clinical and radiological findings of 12 patients presenting to the pediatric neurology clinic in the previous 4 years and diagnosed with SC on the basis of the modified Jones criteria were investigated retrospectively from the hospital files. In addition, we measured the maximum prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia (globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate nucleus) thicknesses in the axial plane from patients' cerebral MRIs and compared these values with prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia thicknesses of a healthy control group measured using the same technique.

Patient and control groups' cranial and basal ganglia MRIs were found to be normal. However, patients' globus pallidus thicknesses were significantly lower than those of the healthy control group. Additionally, the globus pallidus values of patients with recurrent SC and a prolonged healing time were lower than average. However, we determined no significant difference in terms of prefrontal motor cortex, caudate nucleus, or putamen thicknesses between the patient and control groups.

Low globus pallidus thicknesses in patients with SC may indicate atrophy associated with globus pallidus involvement. Further experimental and prospective and long-term studies are needed for a better understanding of the factors affecting the pathophysiology, recurrence, and healing time of SC.

Ethical Committee Approval

Ethics committee approval for the study was obtained from the Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University Clinical Research Ethics Committee (No. 2018/192).


The study previously appeared as an oral presentation at the Turkish Society of Neuroradiology International 28th Annual Meeting on 15–17 February 2019.