CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · AJP Rep 2019; 09(03): e298-e301
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1697654
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Fetomaternal Bleeding and Neonatal Hematocrit following Cesarean Delivery: Routine versus Transplacental Transection

Emily Gregory
1  Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
,
Craig V. Towers
1  Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
,
Jaclyn van Nes
1  Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
,
Kristina Shumard
1  Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
,
Kim B. Fortner
1  Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
,
Beth Weitz
1  Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee
› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was funded through the University of Tennessee Physician's Medical Education and Research Foundation.
Further Information

Publication History

01 July 2019

09 July 2019

Publication Date:
19 September 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Objective To evaluate fetomaternal bleeding following routine cesarean delivery compared with cesarean delivery involving transplacental transection.

Study Design A prospective cohort study evaluating cesarean delivery in which the placenta was transected (cases) versus controls (placenta not transected) from January 2016 to April 2018. A maternal Kleihauer–Betke's (KB) test and newborn hematocrit were performed shortly after delivery.

Results The rate of a positive KB test was not significantly different between cases (n = 31) and controls (n = 61) (19 vs. 14%; odds ratio [OR]: 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.46–4.49; p = 0.74). Median neonatal hematocrits were not different. However, the rate of newborn hematocrits <40% at delivery was higher in cases compared with controls (23 vs. 3%; OR: 8.90; 95% CI: 1.72–45.90; p = 0.005).

Conclusion A cesarean requiring transplacental transection to accomplish delivery does not significantly increase the rate of fetomaternal bleeding but is associated with a higher likelihood of newborn hematocrit <40% at delivery.

Paper Presentation

Oral presentation, 2018 Annual Meeting, Central Association of Obstetricians Gynecologists, October 17–20, 2018, in Minneapolis, MN.