J Pediatr Neurol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1698816
Case Report
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy in a 5-Month-Old Child

Federica Sullo
1  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Milena Motta
1  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Pierluigi Smilari
1  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Luigi Rampello
2  Department of Neurology, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
Filippo Greco
1  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
,
1  Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pediatrics and Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

21 June 2019

16 September 2019

Publication Date:
18 October 2019 (online)

Abstract

Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory polyneuropathy characterized by rapidly progressive, essentially symmetric weakness and areflexia in a previously otherwise healthy child. It is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in children, and its reported incidence is 1 to 2/100,000 population. Prior infection is a well-established predating event in GBS. The commonly recognized variants of GBS are acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy, and Miller–Fisher syndrome. AIDP is the most prevalent form. As Guillain–Barrè syndrome represents an important differential diagnosis in infancy with pronounced and progressive hypotonia, we herein report a case of AMAN in a 5-month-old male infant without known exposure to immunomodulating factors or infections.