J Hip Surg 2019; 03(04): 197-202
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3400481
Invited Technique Paper
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Radiographic Native Femoral Head Size Correlates with Acetabular Cup Size in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
2  Department of General, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Munich, Munich, Germany
,
Jeremy Gililland
1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
Rane Ajinkya
1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
Ian Duensing
1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
Mike B. Anderson
1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
Christopher L. Peters
1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
Christopher E. Pelt
1  Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
› Author Affiliations
Funding Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Grant/Award Number: “Max Kade Foundation/DFG PF 939/1-0”).
Further Information

Publication History

27 August 2019

10 October 2019

Publication Date:
29 November 2019 (online)

Abstract

There is very little literature on whether a simple radiographic measurement of native femoral head size correlates with implanted acetabular cup size. We hypothesized that there would be a high correlation between the radiographically measured native femoral head and implanted acetabular component size in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). We conducted a retrospective study of 277 consecutive patients who underwent primary THA. Patients with prior contralateral THA or a history of congenital deformity were excluded (n = 95). We used the postoperative anteroposterior (AP) pelvic view to calibrate the image using known implanted femoral head component size. We then measured the diameter of the contralateral native femoral head under the assumption that femoral heads are generally symmetrical in patients. Two of the authors performed all measurements. To determine if native femoral head size was correlated with acetabular component size we used the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). There was a high correlation between contralateral native femoral head size and acetabular component size (r = 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.82–0.89). The median difference in radiographically measured native femoral head size and acetabular component size was 7 mm (interquartile range [IQR] = 5–8). Our data showed a high correlation between acetabular component size and radiographically measured contralateral native femoral head size, with the difference being 7 mm. In addition to verifying the actual femoral head size with calipers during surgery, this simple radiographic measurement, which could be done on the affected or contralateral hip, may help surgeons to plan better and improve preoperative templating in primary THA.