CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Semin Hear 2021; 42(04): 352-364
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1739368
Review Article

Mythbusters! The Truth about Common Misconceptions in Cochlear Implantation

Erika A. Woodson
1   Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Ksenia Aaron
1   Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Ahn Nguyen-Huynh
1   Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Jonathan Vargo
2   Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
,
Sarah E. Mowry
2   Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio
3   Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Cochlear implantation (CI) is the preferred method of hearing rehabilitation when patients cannot perform well with traditional amplification. Unfortunately, there are still significant misconceptions around this life-changing intervention. The goal of this article is to address some of the most common myths around CI surgery. After reading this article, the learner will be able to explain the utility of CI in patients with residual hearing and recognize that insurance coverage is widespread. The reader will be able to list common risks associated with this well-tolerated procedure including anesthetic risk and the risk of vestibular dysfunction. Additionally, the reader will be able to identify the significant positive impact of CI on patients' quality of life. Finally, the reader will identify that many patients can safely have an MRI scan after implantation, including nearly all contemporary recipients.

Disclosures

S.E.M.—Paid consultant for Cochlear Americas for educational content to their Web site, educational consultant to Stryker—reimbursed for travel expenses, paid consultant to OtoMed. Other authors have no disclosures.




Publication History

Publication Date:
09 December 2021 (online)

© 2021. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.
333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA