Endosc Int Open 2016; 04(12): E1252-E1260
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-114773
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The efficacy of training insertion skill on a physical model colonoscopy simulator

Annaliese M. Plooy
1  School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
,
Andrew Hill
2  School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
3  Clinical Skills Development Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
,
Mark S. Horswill
2  School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
,
Alanna St.G. Cresp
1  School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
4  School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
,
Rozemary Karamatic
3  Clinical Skills Development Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
,
Stephan Riek
1  School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
,
Guy M. Wallis
1  School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
,
Robin Burgess-Limerick
1  School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
,
David G. Hewett
3  Clinical Skills Development Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
4  School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
,
Marcus O. Watson
2  School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia
3  Clinical Skills Development Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
4  School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, Brisbane, Australia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted21 March 2016

accepted after revision29 July 2016

Publication Date:
30 September 2016 (online)

  

Background and study aims: Prior research supports the validity of performance measures derived from the use of a physical model colonoscopy simulator – the Kyoto Kagaku Colonoscope Training Model (Kyoto Kagaku Co. Ltd., Kyoto, Japan) – for assessing insertion skill. However, its use as a training tool has received little research attention. We assessed the efficacy of a brief structured program to develop basic colonoscope insertion skill through unsupervised practice on the model.

Participants and methods: This was a training study with pretesting and post-testing. Thirty-two colonoscopy novices completed an 11-hour training regime in which they practiced cases on the model in a colonoscopy simulation research laboratory. They also attempted a series of test cases before and after training. For each outcome measure (completion rates, time to cecum and peak force applied to the model), we compared trainees’ post-test performance with the untrained novices and experienced colonoscopists from a previously-reported validation study.

Results: Compared with untrained novices, trained novices had higher completion rates and shorter times to cecum overall (Ps < .001), but were out-performed by the experienced colono-scopists on these metrics (Ps < .001). Nevertheless, their performance was generally closer to that of the experienced group. Overall, trained novices did not differ from either experience-level comparison group in the peak forces they applied (P > .05). We also present the results broken down by case.

Conclusions: The program can be used to teach trainees basic insertion skill in a more or less self-directed way. Individuals who have completed the program (or similar training on the model) are better prepared to progress to supervised live cases.