Endoscopy 2017; 49(02): 113-120
DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-118312
Original article
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Detection of lesions in dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus by community and expert endoscopists

Dirk W. Schölvinck
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands
2  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
,
Kim van der Meulen
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands
,
Jacques J. G. H. M. Bergman
2  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
,
Bas L. A. M. Weusten
1  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands
2  Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

submitted10 May 2016

accepted after revision14 September 2016

Publication Date:
17 November 2016 (online)

Abstract

Background and aims Endoscopic treatment of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) consists of endoscopic resection of visible lesions followed by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for any remaining flat BE. Because RFA is only justified in flat BE, detection of neoplastic lesions (high grade dysplasia [HGD] and early adenocarcinoma [EAC]) is crucial. We hypothesized that the detection of visible lesions containing HGD or EAC would be superior in BE expert centers compared with community hospitals, thereby supporting centralization of therapy for BE-related neoplasia.

Methods Patients referred with histologically proven HGD or EAC to two Dutch BE expert centers were included. Referral letters, and endoscopy and pathology reports were reviewed for the description of the BE, presence of lesions, and histopathological analysis of target and random tissue sampling. Primary outcome was the endoscopic detection rate of lesions containing histopathologically proven neoplasia (HGD and/or EAC) in community and expert centers.

Results There were 198 patients referred from 37 community hospitals (median referral time 55 days [interquartile range 33 – 85]). Detection rates for visible lesions were 60 % in community centers (75 % in patients with a biopsy diagnosis of EAC, 47 % in HGD) and 87 % in expert centers (98 % in EAC, 75 % in HGD); P < 0.001. Even with HGD/EAC on random biopsies from the index endoscopy, the yield at repeat endoscopy was < 50 % in community hospitals. In 79 patients referred solely because of random biopsy results, a lesion requiring endoscopic resection or surgery was found in 76 % by the expert endoscopists.

Conclusions Endoscopists at community hospitals detect neoplastic lesions at a significantly lower rate. These data support the value of BE expert centers for work-up and further treatment of BE.