J Pediatr Genet 2014; 03(03): 147-156
DOI: 10.3233/PGE-14098
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart – New York

A feasibility trial of Cogmed working memory training in fragile X syndrome

Jacky Au
a  Department of Pediatrics, Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA
,
Laura Berkowitz-Sutherland
a  Department of Pediatrics, Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA
,
Andrea Schneider
a  Department of Pediatrics, Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA
,
Julie B. Schweitzer
a  Department of Pediatrics, Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA
,
David Hessl
a  Department of Pediatrics, Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA
,
Randi Hagerman
a  Department of Pediatrics, Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

01 September 2014

14 October 2014

Publication Date:
27 July 2015 (online)

Abstract

Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) often present with an array of neurocognitive deficits, particularly in working memory (WM) and other executive functions. Evidence is accumulating that WM training can be effective in certain clinical populations in improving WM abilities and decreasing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms. We report preliminary findings evaluating the feasibility of Cogmed JM program, a computer-based WM intervention, within the FXS population. Twenty-five participants were evaluated for training. Seventeen were deemed eligible, of whom eight enrolled in the 5-wk training. Baseline characteristics were analyzed, as well as training progress and parental impressions. We conclude that Cogmed JM is a feasible intervention in FXS, though a certain baseline level of ability is required, and urge future controlled trials to determine efficacy.